Pioneer Community Energy Exceeds PG&E’s Payback Credits to Net Energy Metering (Solar) Customers

For Immediate Release: June 10, 2022

Media Contact: Mark Riffey, MarkR@pioneercommunityenergy.org

Pioneer Community Energy Exceeds PG&E’s Payback Credits to Net Energy Metering (Solar) Customers

Pioneer Community Energy, a local-choice electricity provider serving communities in Placer and El Dorado County with competitive rates, reports good news to its more than 30,000 solar customers. The amount sent to customers in bill credits or checks is nearly $484,000 for this cycle. And Pioneer pays a 1/2 cent more than PG&E for each kWh credit (any over-production sold back to the grid).

Customers with a cumulative net surplus of energy (Net Surplus Generators) received checks during the April/May billing period if their credit balance for the past 12 months exceeded $25.00. Credit balances for less than $25.00 rolled forward onto the next bill.

“Cumulatively cashouts to our Net Energy Metering customers is now over $855,931 in payments since 2018 specified Alice Dowdin Calvillo, Chair of the Pioneer Community Energy Board of Directors and Auburn Mayor Pro Tem. “That is a real investment back into the community and certainly an incentive for those considering solar in their future.”

In addition to the greater return on investment due to the higher payback credit for generating their own power, Pioneer also offers the opportunity for existing solar customers to avoid yearly billing, often an unwelcomed surprise for PG&E solar customers.

“With Net Energy Metering, solar power generation credits are applied at the retail rate against the total amount of electricity consumed each month, says Donald Eckert Jr., Executive Director for Pioneer. “Any profits generated are reinvested into the community through programs and services and keeping Pioneer generation rates low.”

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ABOUT PIONEER COMMUNITY ENERGY

Pioneer is a community-owned, not-for-profit agency serving unincorporated Placer and El Dorado County and the incorporated areas of Auburn, Colfax, Lincoln, Placerville, Rocklin and the Town of Loomis. Pioneer serves more than 150,000 residential and commercial customers. Pioneer is a local not-for-profit provider of electricity — we power the communities we serve with competitive rates, reliable service and a choice in energy options. To learn more, visit pioneercommunityenergy.org.

 

Milpitas Community Center Powers Up with Resiliency Grant from Silicon Valley Clean Energy

Milpitas Community Center Powers Up with Resiliency Grant from Silicon Valley Clean Energy

New solar+battery installation at senior center provides clean, backup power for the community during power outages

Milpitas, Calif. – In April, the City of Milpitas cut the ribbon on a new solar and battery storage facility for the community and senior center. Partial funding for the project, totaling $700,000, was provided by a Silicon Valley Clean Energy (SVCE) Community Resilience grant, designed to offer technical and financial assistance to SVCE member communities to increase energy independence and preparation for emergencies.

The project consists of a 75.6 kilowatt (kW) solar array, plus a 125 kW battery. In the case of a power outage or other emergency, Milpitas residents can count on the senior center to be powered and up and running, providing conditioned shelter and a kitchen. Plus, first responders and city employees can use the center as a charging station to power necessary electronics.

Mayor Rich Tran shared, “I am very grateful to SVCE for making the City’s journey towards sustainability, environmental health and emergency resilience a reality. The grant award reinforces our Smart City Infrastructure Program, which is expected to save Milpitas over $1.5 million in energy and water costs per year for a total savings of more than $30 million over the program’s lifetime. I look forward to our continued partnership and success for many years to come.”

Power outages from wildfires, extreme heat, and planned shutoff events are increasing – causing economic and public health impacts across the SVCE service territory. SVCE is investing $5 million in local communities to support a more resilient region. The funds enable local governments to make investments during pandemic-related budget cutbacks and support local jobs in a time of increased unemployment.

“Our communities have faced several energy challenges due to grid constraints over the past few summers. SVCE approved the Community Resilience grant funding to encourage and support our communities to invest in local energy resilience to reduce the impacts of these events, which have been exacerbated by climate change,” said Girish Balachandran, SVCE CEO. “This is the first grant project to be completed, and we look forward to other communities following Milpitas’ lead.”

The solar+battery installation is a part of Milpitas’ Smart City infrastructure program.

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About the City of Milpitas
Located at the southern end of San Francisco Bay, Milpitas is a progressive community that is an integral part of Silicon Valley. A full-service City with water utility, sewer utility, police and fire services, Milpitas celebrates a diverse population of 80,273. Under a Council-Manager form of government, the City Council has established the following seven priority areas of service and policy: public safety, environment, transportation and transit, economic development and job growth, neighborhoods and housing, community wellness and open space, and governance and administration. For more information, visit: www.ci.milpitas.ca.gov

About Silicon Valley Clean Energy
Silicon Valley Clean Energy is a not-for-profit, community-owned agency providing clean electricity from renewable and carbon-free sources to more than 270,000 residential and commercial customers in 13 Santa Clara County jurisdictions. As a public agency, net revenues are returned to the community to keep rates competitive and promote clean energy programs. Silicon Valley Clean Energy is advancing innovative solutions to fight climate change by decarbonizing the grid, transportation, and buildings. Learn more at   SVCleanEnergy.org.

 

Media Contacts
Charmaine Angelo
Public Information Officer, City of Milpitas
O: 408-586-3055
cangelo@milpitas.gov

Michaela Pippin
Communications Specialist, Silicon Valley Clean Energy
O: 408-721-5301 x1020
michaela.pippin@svcleanenergy.org

SFPUC Signs Two Contracts for First Long-Duration Energy Storage Projects

NEWS RELEASE

SFPUC Contact:
Joseph Sweiss

jsweiss@sfwater.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 9, 2022

SFPUC Signs Two Contracts for First Long-Duration Energy Storage Projects

The projects will help state electricity grid reliability for CleanPowerSF’s 385,000 customers in San Francisco

SAN FRANCISCO – The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission’s (SFPUC) community choice energy program, CleanPowerSF, has executed two new agreements to participate in long-duration energy storage through California Community Power – the Tumbleweed Project by REV Renewables, to be located in Kern County, California, and the Goal Line Project by Onward Energy, to be located in San Diego County, California.

The two projects mark the first joint procurement effort that San Francisco is participating in with California Community Power, a group of 10 Community Choice Aggregation programs that procure power for their residents, businesses, and municipalities.

San Francisco’s share of the Tumbleweed Project will provide approximately 11 megawatts of battery energy storage, while its portion of the Goal Line Project will provide 10 megawatts of energy storage capacity. Together, San Francisco’s share of these projects will provide enough energy for about 35,000 average San Francisco residential customers for up to an 8-hour period.

In total, the Tumbleweed Project will provide 69 megawatts of battery energy storage, and the Goal Line Project will provide 50 megawatts.

Long-duration battery storage enables renewable energy resources to supply the grid during more hours of the day. Energy is stored at the time of generation and can be discharged to meet energy demand at a different time. For example, solar energy generated during the day can be stored and discharged at night, when solar generation is low and energy demand is high.

“To effectively combat climate change, we need to transition to cleaner energy,” SFPUC General Manager Dennis Herrera said. “Battery storage is critical to bringing more clean energy onto the grid, particularly at times when there is high demand and low solar generation. It also ensures greater power reliability for California. Adding the Tumbleweed and Goal Line long-duration energy storage projects to our portfolio is another big step forward as we continue to lead when it comes to delivering clean, reliable, and accessible electricity. The SFPUC has been providing power for over a century, and we’re a leader in sustainable energy. All San Franciscans deserve the benefits of getting their electricity from a local public power provider.”

In recent years, CleanPowerSF has been expanding its battery storage portfolio to extend clean energy benefits to the grid at peak times when fossil fuels are often used to meet electricity demand. Earlier this year, CleanPowerSF executed a contract to add battery storage to the Blythe IV solar project in Riverside County, which provides 62 megawatts of clean power to CleanPowerSF customers. The Tumbleweed and Goal Line projects represent CleanPowerSF’s first long-duration battery storage contracts. To date, CleanPowerSF has over 200 megawatts of battery storage under active contract.

The Tumbleweed Project and Goal Line projects are the first joint procurement effort CleanPowerSF is participating in with California Community Power. California Community Power was established in February 2021 to leverage the combined buying power of Community Choice Aggregators for energy supply, programs, and services. CleanPowerSF became a member in April 2021. Other members include Valley Clean Energy, Sonoma Clean Power, Silicon Valley Clean Energy, San Jose Clean Energy, Redwood Coast Energy Authority, Peninsula Clean Energy, MCE, East Bay Community Energy, and Central Coast Community Energy.

CleanPowerSF began serving customers in 2016 with a mission to provide San Francisco residents and businesses with clean, renewable electricity at competitive rates. Today, CleanPowerSF serves about 385,000 customer accounts in San Francisco and offers 50% and 100% renewable electricity service options. Over the past six years, CleanPowerSF has helped reduce greenhouse gas emissions from electricity use by 94% from 1990 levels.

Along with CleanPowerSF, the SFPUC operates Hetch Hetchy Power, which generates and delivers 100 percent greenhouse gas-free energy to more than 4,000 customer accounts, including municipal buildings and facilities, such as City Hall, San Francisco International Airport, schools, libraries and the Muni transit system. Hetch Hetchy Power also provides electricity to some commercial and residential developments, including affordable housing sites. Collectively, the two systems meet over 70 percent of the electricity demand in San Francisco.

About the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) is a department of the City and County of San Francisco. It delivers drinking water to 2.7 million people in the San Francisco Bay Area, collects and treats wastewater for the City and County of San Francisco, and meets over 70 percent of the electricity demand in San Francisco. Our mission is to provide our customers with high quality, efficient and reliable water, power, and sewer services in a manner that values environmental and community interests and sustains the resources entrusted to our care. Learn more at www.sfpuc.org

Central Coast Community Energy Equips Contractors and Homeowners with Cash Incentives Through Home Electrification Program

Central Coast Community Energy Equips Contractors and Homeowners with Cash Incentives Through Home Electrification Program

Electrify Your Home Program Promises Contractors and Homeowners Savings When Converting Household Gas Appliances to All-Electric

Monterey, CA – June 9, 2022 – Central Coast Community Energy (CCCE) launched its Electrify Your Home program, providing contractors with cash incentives for switching gas-powered water heaters and HVAC equipment to all-electric versions in single-family and multi-family homes. Electrify Your Home will further advance CCCE’s efforts to reduce regional greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through electrification of the building sector.

The biggest contributors to GHG emissions on the Central Coast are transportation and the building sector, which relies on natural gas (methane) to power water and space heaters, stovetops, and more. Though CCCE has previously launched two iterations of building electrification programs targeting new construction, this is its first program to target existing buildings.

“Our agency works to reduce GHG emissions on a macro-scale through purchasing clean and renewable power to serve our customers. But we’re also empowering individuals to reduce emissions on a micro-scale by offering rebates and cash incentives to electrify their homes and cars,” explains CCCE CEO, Tom Habashi. “Earlier this year we committed $2.8 million in rebates for electric vehicles and chargers. Now we’re targeting the building sector by making an additional $1.6 million in rebates available to our customers.”

CCCE’s energy programs incentives are tiered to provide the greatest benefit to customers with the fewest resources. Electrify Your Home participants may be eligible for up to $5,800 for an electric heat pump water heater or up to $5,500 for electric HVAC equipment. In addition, contractors completing work on CCCE customer sites that qualify for CARE/FERA are eligible for an additional $1,000 per unit incentive through the Electrify Your Home program. Rebates may help offset part or all of installation costs including labor and electrical panel updates or replacements.

CCCE’s Electrify Your Home program is integrated with TECH Clean California, a massive statewide initiative to incentivize general contractors and homeowners to transition buildings and households away from fossil fuels to help meet the state’s goal to reach carbon neutrality by 2045. Contractors enrolled in the TECH program will be able to apply for rebates via one application and receive one check. Contractors and homeowners can also stack rebates from other programs such as those offered by the Tri-County Regional Energy Network and from Pacific Gas and Electric.

All these programs aim to educate Californians about home electrification and incentivize contractors directly as they are often the first to get the call from homeowners when water heaters break down or plans for remodeling are underway. Contractors are uniquely positioned between manufacturers and end-users and are therefore eligible for rebates that can be passed directly to consumers.

“The truth is most homeowners don’t consider purchasing a new water or space heater until the old one breaks down. In these cases, time is usually of the essence, so most homeowners opt for the appliance their contractor recommends,” shares CCCE Director of Energy Programs, Jon Griesser. “The transition to all-electric homes is dependent on contractors having a vested interest in all-electric appliances, including the technical know-how required for installation.”

Additional resources including registration for free workforce training and development are available through the Switch Is On and TECH Clean California websites. These sites also provide home and building owners a clearinghouse to learn about residential electrification and source local contractors who have been pre-approved to receive incentives by registering with TECH Clean California. For more information about Electrify Your Home, registering with TECH Clean California, and other building electrification resources visit 3Cenergy.org/building-programs/.

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About Central Coast Community Energy

Central Coast Community Energy is a public agency that sources competitively priced electricity from clean and renewable energy resources. CCCE is locally controlled and governed by board members who represent each community served by the agency. Revenue generated by CCCE stays local by funding innovative energy programs designed to lower greenhouse gas emissions and stimulate economic development. CCCE serves more than 435,000 residential, commercial, and agricultural customers in communities located within Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, and Santa Cruz counties. Learn more at 3CEnergy.org and on social media, including Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter @3CEnergy.

For more information:

Central Coast Community Energy

Lena Wallace

Communications Specialist

831-641-7206

lwallace@3ce.org

Clean Power Alliance Board of Directors Selects New Board Chair and Executive Committee Members

Clean Power Alliance Board of Directors Selects New Board Chair and Executive Committee Members

Dr. Julian A. Gold announced as new Board Chair, succeeding successful outgoing Board Chair Diana Mahmud

For immediate release: June 7, 2022

Los Angeles, CA – During its June 2, 2022 meeting, the Clean Power Alliance (CPA) Board of Directors finalized its new incoming board chair, chairs of its three standing committees, and at-large members of its executive committee. The respective board members will serve two-year terms on CPA’s Executive Committee from July 2022 to June 2024.

At its May 11, 2022 meeting, the CPA Board elected City of Beverly Hills Vice Mayor Dr. Julian A. Gold as its incoming board chair. Dr. Gold succeeds City of South Pasadena Councilmember Diana Mahmud, whose two terms as board chair began January 2018 and expire this month.

“Julian has done an absolutely fantastic job of leading our finance committee and always participates as a very engaged member our board,” said Mahmud. “His vast experience in the public and private sectors have helped make Clean Power Alliance a leader in California’s rapidly changing energy market.”

Mahmud served as CPA’s first board chair, bringing a strong background in the energy industry which proved crucial to the organization in its formative stages. She was part of the team that drafted the original joint powers agreement which resulted in South Pasadena becoming one of the founding members of CPA. South Pasadena also became one of the original 10 cities that started service at CPA’s 100% green power option – committing early on to the highest level of renewable energy.

Dr. Gold has been a member of CPA’s Board of Directors since December 2017 and has served as chair of CPA’s Finance Committee since January 2018.

“I am truly humbled by the confidence my fellow board members have placed in me and I very much look forward to continuing to lead this great organization,” said Dr. Gold. “Diana has done an outstanding job of establishing a culture of collaboration within our board and with CPA’s professional staff. Her experience in the energy industry has been vital during CPA’s start-up phase and in establishing CPA as the national leader in providing clean energy.”

The CPA Board also finalized the remaining roster of its incoming executive committee members Mahmud remains a member of the executive committee, serving as immediate past chair of the board. Los Angeles County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl and Ventura County Supervisor Linda Parks will continue in their vice chair positions.

The respective chairs from each of CPA’s standing committees also serve on the Executive Committee. Re-appointed to their roles by Dr. Gold are City of West Hollywood Councilmember Lindsey Horvath, who serves as chair of CPA’s Legislative and Regulatory Committee and City of Sierra Madre Councilmember Robert Parkhurst, who serves as chair of CPA’s Energy Planning & Resources Committee. Joining them as new chair of the Finance Committee will be City of Camarillo Vice Mayor Susan Santangelo. Santangelo had already served on the executive committee as the Ventura County at-large member.

Rounding out the executive committee are three at-large positions, two from Los Angeles County and one from Ventura County. For Los Angeles County, City of Agoura Hills Mayor Deborah Klein Lopez was re-elected and will be joined by City of Hawthorne Councilmember Alex Monteiro.

In addition, City of Ojai Mayor Betsy Stix was elected by Ventura County members to serve in the Ventura County at large position, filling the seat vacated by Santangelo’s move to chair of the finance committee.

Every executive committee member represents cities or counties that have chosen to be supplied with 100% renewable energy through CPA and have been longtime environmental and public health champions in their communities.

“Our staff and I are excited to work with incoming Board Chair Gold and our experienced executive committee on CPA’s next stage of growth and innovation,” said Ted Bardacke, Clean Power Alliance’s Chief Executive Officer. “We’re confident the strong momentum already established by the current board will continue under their leadership.”

About Clean Power Alliance

Founded in 2017, Clean Power Alliance is the locally operated not-for-profit electricity provider for 30 cities across Los Angeles County and Ventura County, as well as the unincorporated areas of both counties. CPA is the fifth largest electricity provider in California and has the most customers receiving 100% renewable energy in the nation. CPA serves approximately three million people via one million customer accounts, providing clean renewable energy at competitive rates. To view CPA’s 2021 Impact Report, click here. For complete information regarding CPA visit www.cleanpoweralliance.org.

Media Contact:

Joseph Cabral

Clean Power Alliance

External Affairs Manager

jcabral@cleanpoweralliance.org 213-442-8109

Collaborating for a Clean Energy Future: California’s First 100% Renewable Multi-Customer Microgrid is Now Operational

Contact: Nancy Stephenson

Phone: (707) 382-7110

NStephenson@RedwoodEnergy.org

Collaborating for a Clean Energy Future: California’s First 100% Renewable Multi-Customer Microgrid is Now Operational

Redwood Coast Airport’s new solar microgrid serves as a blueprint for energy resilience

ARCATA, Calif.— California’s first 100% renewable energy, front-of-the-meter, multi-customer microgrid is now fully operational. Located in Humboldt County, California, the microgrid provides energy resilience for the regional airport and US Coast Guard Air Station.

This microgrid was developed through a first-of-its-kind partnership between the Schatz Energy Research Center at Cal Poly Humboldt, the Redwood Coast Energy Authority, Pacific Gas & Electric, the County of Humboldt, TRC, The Energy Authority, Tesla, Inc., and Schweitzer Engineering Labs.

Research and development was supported through a $5 million grant from California’s Electric Program Investment Charge (EPIC) – a statewide program which invests in scientific and technological research to accelerate the transformation of the electricity sector to meet the state’s energy and climate goals – and by $6 million from the Redwood Coast Energy Authority (RCEA), a joint powers agency that provides clean and renewable power to Humboldt County.

A model for resilient, clean energy

“The Redwood Coast Airport Microgrid has ushered in a new and exciting era for the electric grid in California,” says Peter Lehman, Founding Director of the Schatz Center and project lead. “With its successful deployment and the development of new microgrid agreements and tariffs, RCAM has become a role model and beacon to communities across the state who are striving to green their energy supply and bolster their resilience in the face of climate change.”

The Redwood Coast Airport Microgrid (RCAM) features a 2.2-megawatt solar photovoltaic array that is DC-coupled to a 2-megawatt (9 megawatt-hour) battery energy storage system, comprised of three Tesla Megapacks.

During standard blue-sky operations, RCAM generates clean and renewable energy for the North Coast, and participates in the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) wholesale energy markets, including the day-ahead, real time, and ancillary services markets. By storing solar energy during the day and releasing it onto the grid as needed in the evening and during heavy demand periods, RCAM enables greater utilization of solar, supports grid reliability, and creates an economic model for future microgrids.

When a power outage occurs, the microgrid islands from the main grid and energizes the circuit that encompasses the airport, the adjacent Coast Guard Air Station, and several neighboring facilities. RCAM will provide seamless, ongoing electricity for all customers in the microgrid circuit during any local outages.

As the first microgrid in the CAISO market and the first renewable, front-of-the-meter microgrid system in the state, RCAM is building a replicable business model for renewable microgrid deployment.

Meeting critical resilience goals

The regional California Redwood Coast-Humboldt County Airport (ACV) is located in McKinleyville, California, and serves the greater North Coast community with over 50,000 flights per year, including commercial airline, private, and emergency medical flights. Adjacent to the airport, the US Coast Guard Air Station Humboldt Bay provides search and rescue for 250 miles of rural coastline, from the Mendocino-Sonoma county line to the California-Oregon border.

Roads into Humboldt County are frequently closed by fires and mudslides, making air services a critical factor in regional emergency response.

Cody Roggatz, Humboldt County’s Director of Aviation says that “The California Redwood Coast-Humboldt County Airport (ACV) is a lifeline to our community every day by keeping Humboldt County connected to the world alongside our partners at United Airlines, Avelo Airlines, American Airlines, REACH/Cal-Ore Life Flights, US Coast Guard-Sector Humboldt Bay, and many others. RCAM ensures that we can continue to keep that lifeline open through energy resilience, no matter what happens to the power grid.”

Community microgrids: partnering for resilience

Deploying multi-customer, front-of-the-meter community microgrids requires close coordination between the microgrid design team, the electric utility, and an electricity generation partner who can energize the microgrid when needed. Because these microgrids utilize circuitry that is owned and maintained by the utility, their control systems must be responsive to utility commands and safety needs, while maintaining a clear delineation between utility-owned and generation partner-owned equipment. Furthermore, participating in the wholesale market requires that the system also be responsive to market signals.

  • Design and development of the RCAM project was led by Schatz Energy Research Center at Cal Poly Humboldt. The Schatz Center’s microgrid research and development focuses on resilient renewable energy solutions for the California North Coast and beyond.
  • The Redwood Coast Energy Authority (RCEA) is the Community Choice Aggregator for Humboldt County, serving 63,000 electric account customers and supporting energy efficiency alongside local, clean and renewable energy solutions. RCEA is responsible for the majority of the Humboldt Bay area’s energy resource procurement and owns and operates the electricity generation equipment for the microgrid.
  • PG&E maintains the regional electricity grid, which serves over 16 million people in Northern and Central California and owns and operates the microgrid circuit.

“An important success of RCAM was how we were able to work through the complex financial, technical, regulatory, business, and operational hurdles facing this project,” says Dana Boudreau, RCEA’s director of Operations and Infrastructure. “This experience will serve us well as we continue to engage our community in building offshore wind energy, supporting more solar and storage capacity, and developing new community microgrids.”

Part of a growing trend

The unique collaboration between RCAM project partners has resulted in both technical and policy innovations. RCAM is the model for PG&E’s Community Microgrid Enablement Program – which provides technical assistance and cost offsets for community microgrid deployment. Additionally, PG&E’s Microgrid Incentive Program, expected to launch later this year, will leverage a $200 million statewide fund dedicated to deploying clean energy microgrids, to support the critical needs of vulnerable populations and disadvantaged communities.

“The Redwood Coast Airport Microgrid represents the culmination of many years of research, innovation, and collaboration by the world’s leading microgrid experts. Thanks to their hard work, microgrids now play a key role in PG&E’s ongoing efforts to harden our electrical system and enhance local grid resilience throughout Northern and Central California,” says Jason Glickman, Executive Vice President, Engineering, Planning and Strategy, PG&E. “We know how much our customers and communities need reliable energy, and this system not only increases local reliability, but it serves as the foundation for a replicable and scalable model for widely deploying multi-customer microgrids across PG&E’s service area, giving communities a new tool to take a more active role in securing their resilience and clean energy goals.”

Next steps for the North Coast

“RCEA’s goal is to provide our customers with 100% carbon-free electricity by 2025, and 100% local carbon-free electricity by 2030. This project is a major milestone for our clean energy and resilience efforts,” says Matthew Marshall, Executive Director of RCEA. RCEA works closely with schools, fire departments, Native American Tribes, and other local agencies to support community resilience across the North Coast.

Renewable energy microgrids are uniquely suited to help rural Tribes and other communities adapt to climate change and simultaneously mitigate future climate impacts. The Schatz Center is partnering with a number of Tribes in Northern California to support their clean energy, resilience, and climate response efforts.

Cal Poly Humboldt also recently began design of a renewable energy microgrid to support campus resilience through clean generation. This microgrid will be part of the university’s sustainability framework, and will enable students in engineering, environmental sciences, and other programs to gain hands-on experience with innovative climate-friendly technologies.

More information

About the Schatz Center

Since 1989, the Schatz Center has produced groundbreaking, renewable energy solutions that reduce climate change and pollution while increasing energy access and resilience. Located on the campus of Cal Poly Humboldt, the Schatz Center’s research efforts include microgrids, offshore wind, off-grid energy access, carbon life cycles, clean transportation, and more. The Center works closely with state agencies, local government, and Tribal nations in California, as well as with the World Bank Group, CLASP, IKEA Foundation, and others to support international energy access and resilience. Learn more at schatzcenter.org

About RCEA

Established in 2003, the Redwood Coast Energy Authority is a local government joint powers agency whose members include the County of Humboldt, the seven cities within the county, and the Humboldt Bay Municipal Water District. The Energy Authority’s purpose is to develop and implement sustainable energy initiatives that reduce energy demand, increase energy efficiency, and advance the use of clean, efficient, and renewable resources available in the region. For more info, visit redwoodenergy.org

About PG&E

PG&E, a subsidiary of PG&E Corporation (NYSE:PCG), is a combined natural gas and electric utility serving more than 16 million people across 70,000 square miles in Northern and Central California. For more information, visit pge.com and pge.com/news.

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Sonoma Clean Power Executes Power Purchase Agreement with Luminia for 11.6 MW Solar Plus 8 MW Energy Storage Project

Sonoma Clean Power Executes Power Purchase Agreement with Luminia for 11.6 MW Solar Plus 8 MW Energy Storage Project

Project to reliably alleviate grid constraints and deliver clean, renewable energy to residents.

Luminia and Sonoma Clean Power (SCP) announced today the signing of a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) for the development of an 11.6 MW AC solar plus 32 MWh battery storage project in Sonoma, California. Construction of the 75-acre project is expected in the second half of 2023 in southern Sonoma County, tying into a nearby electrical substation.

“Deploying reliable solar and storage projects with community choice aggregators like Sonoma Clean Power reinforces renewable energy as the new standard in our daily energy lives,” said Dale A. Vander Woude, chief investment officer of Luminia. “We formed an excellent team with Kenwood Investments to provide Sonoma Clean Power with a solution for its resource adequacy demand, which is what brought this important project to fruition in Sonoma County.”

In addition to the PPA, Luminia and Kenwood Investments, LLC, are managing the late-stage development of the project. Once completed, SCP will dispatch the 100 percent renewable, locally generated electricity to its EverGreen premium service customers throughout Sonoma and Mendocino counties. The 11.6 MW AC solar PV system also includes 32 MWh of lithium-ion battery storage that can distribute stored solar power across the grid during peak evening hours.

“Our mission is to make cleaner electricity accessible to our customers by putting the power to procure energy in the hands of local communities,” said Deb Emerson, managing director of procurement for Sonoma Clean Power. “With this solar and storage project we can provide renewable energy on-demand, regardless of the time of day, and promote 100 percent carbon-free energy generated right here in Sonoma County.”

Sonoma Clean Power has set the bar when it comes to renewable electricity options for residential and commercial customers. EverGreen is the only generation service in the U.S. that is truly renewable 24/7. EverGreen utilizes solar and geothermal power from facilities located exclusively in Sonoma and Mendocino counties.

Darius Anderson, managing member of Kenwood Investments, said, “It is an honor to work with Sonoma Clean Power, County stakeholders and Luminia on this important solar project for the Sonoma community.”

SCP issued a Request for Proposals in June 2021 in response to the Board’s request to procure more local renewable resources for EverGreen. The companies then entered into an exclusivity agreement for the project in November 2021.

To learn more about Luminia’s unique solar PV and energy efficiency financing solutions for commercial and community projects, visit luminia.io. To learn more about SCP’s EverGreen-Local Resource Plan, visit sonomacleanpower.org/programs/evergreen.

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About Luminia

Founded in 2019, California-based Luminia provides unique financing and technology platform solutions that enable the deployment of commercial property sustainability improvements at scale. Through novel financing options and artificial intelligence-driven commercial real estate portfolio analysis, Luminia empowers commercial and industrial property owners to implement holistic clean energy and energy efficiency upgrades without barriers. Luminia’s solutions are purpose built to offer the greatest potential economic benefit and advance a property’s ability to meet ESG requirements. For more information, visit luminia.io.

About Sonoma Clean Power

SCP is the not-for-profit public power provider that operates a Community Choice Aggregation or ‘CCA’ for Sonoma and Mendocino counties, serving a population of about a half million. SCP has operated for 8 years, serving all the cities and unincorporated areas of the two counties except Healdsburg and Ukiah, where long-standing municipal power providers exist. In downtown Santa Rosa, SCP operates the only Advanced Energy Center in the United States dedicated to helping customers transition to 100% renewable energy for their homes, businesses, and cars. SCP is also the only power provider in California offering 100% renewable energy twenty-four per day, every day of the year. To learn more, visit sonomacleanpower.org or call 1 (855) 202-2139.

$20,000 in Scholarship Prizes Awarded to Students in EmPower Silicon Valley Short Film Competition

$20,000 in Scholarship Prizes Awarded to Students in EmPower Silicon Valley Short Film Competition

High schoolers share stories and solutions about a clean energy future

Sunnyvale, Calif. – Local students have been recognized by Silicon Valley Clean Energy (SVCE) with $20,000 in scholarship prizes for the second year of the EmPower Silicon Valley Youth Short Film Competition. Through the competition, high school students showcased a variety of clean energy futures and solutions that will help us fight climate change.

Exploring ideas ranging from harnessing energy from sound to the end of car dependency, competition participants showcased their creativity and storytelling skills through animation, documentaries, and narrative film.

Four exemplary submissions were awarded $3,000 scholarship prizes. These short films received distinctions for their effective messaging and artistic delivery.

  • Energy Impact Award: A Future Without Car Dependency by Xinpei Lu from Cupertino High School
  • Energy Innovation Award: Acoustic Energy by Hernan Maldonado and Abhik Das from Monta Vista High School
  • Creative Presentation Award: For the Sake of the Planet by Alyssa Hwang from Cupertino High School
  • Community Engagement Award: Putting Out the Global Fire by Elise Chiu and Nishika Gorla from Monta Vista High School

Additionally, Honorable Mention awards of $2,000 each were awarded to the following short films:

  • Monarch Butterfly Effect by Maia Shama, Kai Otsuka, and George Hu from Saratoga High School
  • The Silicon Green Vision by Seeun Kim from Fremont High School and Ava Mineishi from Branham High School
  • Silicon Valley’s Clean Future by Om Shastri, Julio Casal, and Macha Karpov from Los Gatos High School
  • Silicon Valley: A (Clean Energy) Future Worth Investing In by Ben Richardson from Monta Vista High School and Christopher Li and Emily Chen from Lynbrook High School

“We were impressed by the ingenuity and diversity of the submitted films. Representing the next generation, youth make up a core component of the SVCE mission to combat climate change and ensure a clean energy future. The students’ visions of this future were inspiring and uplifting,” said Girish Balachandran, SVCE CEO.

The short films were judged by a panel of SVCE board members, youth, community leaders, and film industry professionals.

The EmPower Silicon Valley Short Film Competition is a part of the SVCE education initiatives designed to support and engage youth in our community.

View the winning short films at SVCleanEnergy.org/Empower-SV.

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About Silicon Valley Clean Energy

Silicon Valley Clean Energy is a not-for-profit, community-owned agency providing clean electricity from renewable and carbon-free sources to more than 270,000 residential and commercial customers in 13 Santa Clara County jurisdictions. As a public agency, net revenues are returned to the community to keep rates competitive and promote clean energy programs. Silicon Valley Clean Energy is advancing innovative solutions to fight climate change by decarbonizing the grid, transportation, and buildings. Learn more at SVCleanEnergy.org.

Media Contact: 
Michaela Pippin, michaela.pippin@svcleanenergy.org, 408-721-5301 x1020

Idemitsu Renewables 73MW Luciana Solar Project achieves commercial operation in California

Idemitsu Renewables 73MW Luciana Solar Project achieves commercial operation in California

The project will provide clean power equivalent to the needs of over 20,000 homes.

San Francisco, CA (May 31, 2022) – The Luciana solar project, a 73 megawatt solar project in Tulare County, CA has achieved commercial operation and is expected to generate clean and affordable power equivalent to the needs of over 20,000 California homes.

The project, located in Ducor, CA, provided jobs for over 200 workers during construction, mainly sourced from local union halls in surrounding areas. The Luciana project also provides on-going economic development in the form of fees and tax revenues to Tulare County.

“Considering the unprecedented supply chain challenges the industry faced this past year, we are proud to have successfully achieved commercial operation of the Luciana project through our partnership with East Bay Clean Energy (EBCE),” said Cary Vandenberg, CEO of Idemitsu Renewables. “By leveraging our financial strength and development expertise, we’re helping California meet its aggressive clean energy goals while also providing significant investment in Tulare County.”

The renewable power generated by the Luciana project will be sold through a 15-year power purchase agreement with EBCE, which serves Alameda County and neighboring cities.

“The Luciana project brings more low-cost renewable energy to EBCE’s portfolio, and it’s another big step forward on EBCE’s path to 100% clean energy for all of our customers by 2030,” said Nick Chaset, EBCE’s CEO.

By bringing the Luciana project to commercial operation, Idemitsu Renewables celebrates its commitment to being a leader in the U.S. renewable energy space.

About EBCE

EBCE is a not-for-profit public agency that operates a Community Choice Energy program for Alameda County and fourteen incorporated cities, serving more than 1.7 million residential and commercial customers. EBCE initiated service in June 2018 and expanded to Tracy in neighboring San Joaquin County in 2021. As one of 19 community choice aggregation (CCA) programs operating in California, EBCE is part of the movement to expedite the climate action goals of their communities and those of California. EBCE is committed to providing clean power at competitive rates while reinvesting in its local communities. For more information about East Bay Community Energy, visit ebce.org.

About Idemitsu Renewables

Idemitsu Renewables, the U.S. based renewable energy subsidiary of Idemitsu Kosan Co.,Ltd., is a leading solar and energy storage developer and independent power producer. The company acquires, develops, owns, and operates utility-scale solar power generation plants throughout North America and has offices in California and Nevada. Learn more at www.idemitsurenewables.com.

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East Bay Community Energy Adds Fervo Geothermal Energy to Portfolio, Opening Doors to 24/7 Zero-Emission Electricity

Contact Information

Mission Control for EBCE

ebce@missionc2.com

Fervo Energy

sarah@fervoenergy.com

East Bay Community Energy Adds Fervo Geothermal Energy to Portfolio, Opening Doors to 24/7 Zero-Emission Electricity

EBCE becomes the latest community choice aggregator (CCA) to add mandated non-weather-reliant power source, stabilizing long-term consumer prices & powering 44,000+ homes annually

Oakland, CA (May 24, 2022) – East Bay Community Energy (EBCE), one of the nation’s top-ranking clean energy providers, is partnering with Fervo Energy to equip EBCE with geothermal power, adding non-weather-dependent clean energy to its power supply. Helping communities maintain resilience in today’s evolving energy landscape, EBCE enables consistently stable, long-term energy rates by leveraging power that can be accessed and meet demand regardless of the season, weather, or time of day. Developed by Fervo Energy, this facility marks EBCE’s first geothermal power purchase agreement (PPA), broadening the agency’s clean energy portfolio.

EBCE tapped Fervo Energy, a next-generation geothermal company applying transformative geothermal technology to address climate change, to increase its carbon-free energy deployment in response to a State of California mandate to procure 1,000 MW of non-weather-dependent, zero-emission energy by 2026. This project will dispatch 40 megawatts of firm, 24/7, zero-emission geothermal energy from Churchill County, Nevada to California’s regional grid, with expected operation in Q4 2026.

Fervo Energy brings a variety of innovative technologies to geothermal including horizontal drilling and distributed fiber optic sensing to deliver more reliable and cost-effective projects. This approach makes geothermal power accessible in far more places than before and dramatically increases its potential as a widespread energy source.

“Geothermal power is vital to achieving the decarbonization goals of California and around the world,” said Tim Latimer, CEO at Fervo Energy. “East Bay Community Energy has established itself as the leader in scaling dependable, clean electricity in the best interest of its customers, and we’re honored to be partnering with them.”

Serving Alameda County and fourteen incorporated cities, EBCE offers a power mix of carbon-free and renewable energy sources including wind, solar, hydro, and geothermal, with a goal of providing 100 percent clean electric service for its customers by 2030 – 15 years ahead of California’s target date. With this first geothermal PPA, EBCE is doubling down on providing long-term stable prices for its ratepayers, while ensuring greater reliability as more regions fall under the threat of climate change-induced power outages.

“Developing a diverse portfolio of clean energy facilities helps keep prices stable and the lights on,” said Nick Chaset, CEO at EBCE. “As one of the cleanest energy providers in California, adding geothermal to our portfolio adds resiliency to the communities we serve and a level of stability EBCE customers can count on.”

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About EBCE

EBCE is a not-for-profit public agency that operates a Community Choice Energy program for Alameda County and fourteen incorporated cities, serving more than 1.7 million residential and commercial customers. EBCE initiated service in June 2018 and expanded to Tracy in neighboring San Joaquin County in 2021. As one of 24 community choice aggregation (CCA) programs operating in California, EBCE is part of the movement to expedite the climate action goals of their communities and those of California. EBCE is committed to providing clean power at competitive rates while reinvesting in its local communities. For more information about East Bay Community Energy, visit ebce.org.

About Fervo Energy

Fervo Energy produces 24/7 carbon-free energy through next-generation geothermal energy technology. The company commercializes technology to develop, own, and operate geothermal assets that will be key to decarbonizing the electric grid. Fervo brings a variety of innovative technologies to geothermal including horizontal drilling and distributed fiber optic sensing to deliver more reliable and cost-effective projects, developed with partners including Schlumberger, ARPA-E, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. Fervo is supported through Capricorn’s Technology Impact Fund, Breakthrough Energy Ventures, and the Department of Energy. fervoenergy.com.