State Proposes $33M in New Funding for Electric Vehicle Charging in Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties

California Energy Commission to help the Peninsula and South Bay keep pace with rapid adoption of electric vehicles

Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties, Calif. – The California Energy Commission is partnering with five local energy agencies to launch an incentive project for the installation of public electric vehicle (EV) charging stations throughout Santa Clara and San Mateo counties. As more Californians choose to drive EVs and the state transitions to an electric transportation system, there is a continued need for available charging stations. This is especially the case in Silicon Valley, which has the highest rate of EV sales in the state.

The project, expected to launch in spring of 2020, is an initiative of the Energy Commission’s California Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Project (CALeVIP), which works with local community partners to develop and implement regional incentive projects for charging infrastructure that supports the adoption of EVs statewide. Funding will span two to four years.

The Energy Commission is proposing to provide $21 million in incentives to Santa Clara County and $12 million in incentives to San Mateo County. City of Palo Alto Utilities, Peninsula Clean Energy, San José Clean Energy, Silicon Valley Clean Energy and Silicon Valley Power are pledging to contribute millions in matching funds to this effort, pending approval by their respective governing boards or city councils. By leveraging local investment, CALeVIP funds will further expand EV charging accessibility in the region.

“This project will help provide the necessary infrastructure for the shift to a clean, electric transportation system statewide,” says California Senator Bob Wieckowski. “Adding charging options in convenient locations will make electric vehicles accessible for those unable to charge at home. This in turn will support a continued increase in EV adoption, allowing our communities to meet our climate goals, and helping everyone benefit from better local air quality.”

“The lack of charging stations is one of the main reasons consumers are reluctant to make the switch to electric vehicles. We can’t move the needle on EV adoption unless we aggressively expand our charging infrastructure. This state and local funding partnership would not only support the current demand in the South Bay and Peninsula, but also help meet the needs of future EV drivers,” said Assemblymember Phil Ting (D-San Francisco), whose district includes northern San Mateo County.

“The Energy Commission is excited to work with all our partners on this project to increase access to convenient charging for electric vehicles in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties,” said Commissioner Patty Monahan of the Energy Commission. “By expanding the state’s charging network, CALeVIP projects like this one help the state transition to zero-emission transportation, provide cleaner air and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.”

CALeVIP works to address regional needs for EV charging infrastructure throughout California, while supporting the state’s goals to improve air quality, fight climate change and reduce petroleum use.

The incentive project will help increase the number of fast chargers and Level 2 chargers in public, workplace and multi-family housing locations, as well as along highway corridors.

Fast chargers provide at least 100 miles of range per hour of charging, and some can charge a battery up to 80 percent in 30 minutes. Level 2 chargers provide 15-35 miles of range per hour of charging, which is enough for most day-to-day driving.

California’s goal is to get 5 million EVs on its roads by 2030 to reduce carbon emissions and to support those vehicles by installing 250,000 chargers statewide, including 10,000 direct current fast chargers, by 2025.

Santa Clara and San Mateo counties receive clean electricity from local energy providers that is at a minimum 80 percent greenhouse-gas free. Powering cars with electricity rather than fossil fuels dramatically reduces tailpipe emissions that contribute to climate change and air pollution. CALeVIP funding and the matching funds from local agencies will help Santa Clara and San Mateo counties accelerate this transition, reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector, the leading source of emissions in Silicon Valley.

CALeVIP has several regional projects throughout the state, including projects in Fresno, Sacramento and Southern California. CALeVIP and its regional projects are implemented by the Center for Sustainable Energy and funded primarily by the Energy Commission’s Clean Transportation Program (also known as the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program).

###

Full press release here: https://www.svcleanenergy.org/news/state-proposes-33m-in-new-funding-for-electric-vehicle-charging-in-santa-clara-and-san-mateo-counties/

 

Valley Clean Energy Board to Study Purchase of PG&E Assets

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Friday, August 9, 2019
Press Contact: Vicky Zavattero
530-446-2756 | v.zavattero@valleycleanenergy.org

Valley Clean Energy Board to Study Purchase of PG&E Assets

The Valley Clean Energy (VCE) Board of Directors — composed of elected officials from Woodland, Davis, and Yolo County — is studying the potential acquisition of PG&E distribution facilities in Yolo County as a way to provide safer, cleaner, more reliable and affordable electricity service to its customers.

PG&E’s recent bankruptcy filing provides an opportunity for a fresh look at how electricity is delivered.

The decision to explore options to provide electric distribution service is not unique to VCE — the city of San Francisco and the South San Joaquin Irrigation District (SSJID) in the greater Manteca/Ripon/Escalon area are doing the same.

In June, after 15 years of fighting for local control, the mayors of Manteca, Ripon and Escalon authored a letter asking for support from Gov. Gavin Newsom. The governor’s appointed Energy Strike Force wrote in its April 12, 2019, report, “After years of mismanagement and safety failures, no options can be taken off the table to reform PG&E, including municipalization of all or a portion of PG&E’s operations…”

The PG&E bankruptcy affords an ideal opportunity to determine whether a “public power” electric service approach might provide greater control, benefits and safeguards to California communities.

“Exploring the feasibility of this option is the responsible thing to do for our customers,” said VCE Board Chair Tom Stallard, a member of the Woodland City Council. “And the timing of this opportunity is unique. If we find a practical path forward, transferring PG&E’s poles and lines could mean a safer electricity system and benefits for both customers and the environment — it could bring a real sea change in local power provision.”

While the cost and responsibility of operating and upgrading electrical distribution lines is significant, there are many proven examples showing it is practical for public ownership of power facilities. There are currently 54 public power utilities in California serving almost a third of Californians. VCE will evaluate the benefits and risks of public ownership, as well as possible governance options.

Lucas Frerichs, VCE Board member and Davis City Council member, stated, “Although the structures of various public power utilities may differ, their objectives are always the same: achieving greater control over system safety, investment in equipment upgrades, transparent public governance, and rate stability to benefit all power consumers.”

VCE currently provides more than 90 percent of the electrical generation needs in Woodland, Davis, and unincorporated Yolo County. But customers still must pay PG&E for the distribution of that power to their homes and businesses.

Having full control over both electricity distribution and generation could help achieve VCE’s stated goals of providing cost-competitive clean energy, product choice, increased energy efficiency and price stability.

VCE’s exploratory process will weigh costs and benefits of public power and assess risks that may be associated with ownership of the local distribution system. It is possible to reduce and better control risk by removing the private profit motive and using profits otherwise distributed to PG&E shareholders for reinvestment in the safety of local electric power.

Regular updates on VCE’s feasibility study will be provided at the agency’s board meetings where the board encourages public input. For more information about VCE or the feasibility study, visit www.ValleyCleanEnergy.org.

###

San José Clean Energy, EDP Renewables Sign Long-term Agreement for 100 MW of Solar and 10 MW of Battery Storage

For Immediate Release

Contacts

Zachary Struyk, Deputy Director, Account Management and Marketing San José Clean Energy, City of
San José

(408) 535-4868; zachary.struyk@sanjoseca.gov

Blair Matocha, Communications Manager EDP Renewables North America

(281) 414-7589, blair.matocha@edpr.com

San José Clean Energy, EDP Renewables Sign Long-term Agreement for 100 MW of Solar and 10 MW of Battery Storage

SJCE’s first agreement will help meet San José’s climate goals and accelerate renewable energy in  California

SAN JOSE, Calif. August 7, 2019 – Today, San José Clean Energy (SJCE) and EDP Renewables SA (EDPR), through its fully owned subsidiary EDP Renewables North America LLC (EDPR NA), signed a 20-year  power purchase agreement (PPA) for 100 megawatts (MW) of new solar energy and 10 MW of battery  storage at the Sonrisa Solar Park in Fresno County, California. The project is anticipated to be  operational in 2022.

This long-term agreement is the first of many SJCE expects to sign to meet customer demand for  renewable energy, which will total 2,000 GWh annually by 2022. SJCE serves more than 328,000
residential and business customers and has a high participation rate (98.6%).

“100 MW of solar energy will enable San José Clean Energy to power nearly 36,000 homes each year  with clean electricity—the same impact as removing more than 871,000 cars from our city’s roads,”  said Mayor Sam Liccardo. “Today’s investment will avoid more than 4.1 million tons of greenhouse  gases from our air, bringing us another step closer towards meeting the aggressive emission  reduction targets defined in our Climate Smart San José plan and securing a sustainable future for  our community.”

Operated by the Community Energy Department, SJCE is San José’s Community Choice Aggregator (CCA).  Through Community Choice, local governments like the City of San José buy electricity from cleaner  sources, while the investor-owned utility (PG&E, for San José) continues to deliver the electricity  over their transmission and distribution infrastructure.

“A long-term PPA produces power at a lower price than short-term contracts, so SJCE will see our  operational costs decrease,” said Lori Mitchell, Community Energy Department Director. “Because  SJCE is a government agency, these savings will be reinvested into our community through lower  rates and community programs – instead of going to shareholders. This agreement is a win for the environment, a win for our ratepayers, and a win for San José.”

The Sonrisa Solar Park will be EDPR’s first North American project to include both solar energy and  battery storage. The project will bring economic benefits to the state by way of jobs, landowner  and tax payments, and money spent in local communities. With battery storage, solar energy can be generated during the day and distributed during the evening peak hours.

“Energy storage plays an important role in creating a more flexible and reliable grid system, and  as storage technology progresses, EDPR will continue to pursue the inclusion of storage at
additional projects within our portfolio,” said Miguel Prado, EDP Renewables North America CEO.  “EDP Renewables is pleased to contribute to the increasing amount of clean power in California and  aid SJCE in meeting its customers’ call for clean, emission-free energy.”

SJCE joins another local CCA East Bay Community Energy (EBCE) in purchasing energy from EDPR’s  Sonrisa Solar Park, as announced on June 20, 2019. EDPR’s agreements with SJCE and EBCE will enable  200 MW of solar and 40 MW of storage to be constructed at the project. Collaborating on power  purchase agreements creates planning and economic efficiencies. CCAs are driving California’s clean energy future: in total, the CPUC projects that CCAs will contract for more than 10,000 MW of new renewable resources by 2030, compared to 1,000 MW pledged by California investor-owned utilities.

The agreement with EDPR reflects SJCE’s financial stability and growing financial resources. SJCE  leveraged its $1 billion buying authority from the San José City Council.

“By empowering San José Clean Energy to manage our city’s power supply, we’re expanding our  residents’ and business’ access to renewable energy, while also shrinking their utility bills,”
added Mayor Liccardo.

SJCE’s default power mix GreenSource includes 45% renewable energy – 6% more than PG&E’s standard  mix – at 1% lower rates. Customers can upgrade to SJCE TotalGreen service to receive 100% renewable  energy. Nearly 1,000 customers have upgraded to TotalGreen.

“Renewable energy prices have fallen drastically over the last years, to the point that the average  total cost to build and operate renewables is often lower than fossil fuels,” said Jeanne Solé,
Community Energy Deputy Director of Power Resources Management. “We’re excited to take advantage of  these low prices and to include storage in our project to maximize the value of the solar  generation for our customers and improve grid reliability.”

Increasing the amount of renewable and carbon-free energy powering San José is a key component of  Climate Smart San José, the city’s climate action plan. The goal is to provide San José with 100%  carbon-free power by 2021 and 100% renewable power by 2050.

About the City of San José

With more than one million residents, San José is one of the most diverse large cities in the  United States and is Northern California’s largest city and the 10th largest city in the nation.
San José’s transformation into a global innovation center has resulted in one of the largest  concentrations of technology companies and expertise in the world. In 2011, the City adopted  Envision San José 2040, a long-term growth plan that sets forth a vision and a comprehensive road  map to guide the City’s anticipated growth through the year 2040.

About the Community Energy Department

San José Clean Energy is the new electricity generation service provider for residents and  businesses in the City of San José, operated by the City’s Community Energy Department. Governed by
the San José City Council, it provides over 328,000 residential and commercial electricity customers with cleaner,  lower carbon power options at competitive prices, from sources like solar, wind and hydropower. For  more information, please visit www.SanJoseCleanEnergy.org.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @SJCleanEnergy.

About EDP Renewables North America

EDP Renewables North America LLC (“EDPR NA”) and its subsidiaries develop, construct, own, and  operate wind farms and solar parks throughout North America. Headquartered in Houston, Texas, with  48 wind farms, five solar parks, and 13 regional and development offices across North America, EDPR  NA has developed more than 6,700 megawatts (MW) and operates more than 6,100 MW of renewable energy  projects. EDP Renewables is a wind and solar energy industries leader in California. The company’s  footprint in the state includes three phases of the Rising Tree Wind Farm in Kern County as well as  two phases of the Lone Valley Solar Park in San Bernardino County. These projects produce enough  clean electricity to annually power more than 101,000 average California homes. EDPR NA is owned by  EDP Renováveis, S.A. (EDPR). For more information, visit www.edprnorthamerica.com.

About EDP Renewables

EDP Renewables (Euronext: EDPR) is a global leader in the renewable energy sector and the world’s  fourth-largest wind energy producer. With a sound development pipeline, first class assets, and  market- leading operating capacity, EDPR has undergone exceptional development in recent years and  is currently present in 14 markets (Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, France, Greece, Italy,  Mexico, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, the UK, and the U.S.). Energias de Portugal, S.A.  (“EDP”), the principal shareholder of EDPR, is a global energy company and a leader in value  creation, innovation, and sustainability. EDP has been included in the Dow Jones Sustainability Index for 12 consecutive years. For further information, visit www.edpr.com.

# # #

This news release is available at www.sanjoseca.gov

MCE Customers Offered $1.3 Million in Cash Back for Generating Their Own Solar Energy in 2018-19

Over 70% of Cash Outs Go to Municipalities and Schools That Have Invested in Solar Panels

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Aug. 1, 2019
Press Contact: Kalicia Pivirotto, Marketing Manager
(415) 464-6036 | kpivirotto@mcecleanenergy.org

SAN RAFAEL and CONCORD, Calif. — MCE is issuing cash outs totaling over $1.3 million to rooftop solar customers when they have produced more electricity than they used themselves. MCE’s Net Energy Metering (NEM) program currently provides incentives for rooftop solar customers, including paying premium rates that compensate solar customers at the full retail rate plus an extra penny per kilowatt-hour for excess electricity generated.

MCE’s NEM program is an example of MCE’s mission in action: supporting in-service area renewables, reducing carbon, lowering energy costs through self-generation, and incentivizing local rooftop solar through the annual cash-out process, which is another channel for community reinvestment.

Customers also have the option to transfer their credits to MCE programs that serve disadvantaged communities, like the MCE Solar Rebate Program. Since launching the program in 2013, MCE has allocated $535,000 in income-qualified solar rebates through a partnership with GRID AlternativesEnergy for All Program, which reduces household electricity costs by up to 90 percent by providing no-cost solar systems to homeowners who qualify as low income.

“MCE’s solar program is a great incentive for everyone in our region to be less reliant on energy sources that are contributing to climate change and the growing threat of wildfires,” said Elizabeth Patterson, Mayor of Benicia and MCE Board Member. “Many of the recipients of the innovative cash-out program are local governments and schools that are using these funds to reinvest in making our communities more resilient.”

MCE has a high number of rooftop solar customers in its service area, with NEM participants making up over 7 percent of MCE’s total customer base. This year, MCE’s cash outs were distributed as follows:

• ~$635,000 in Contra Costa County
• ~$270,000 in Marin County
• ~$250,000 in Napa County
• ~$216,000 in Solano County

Of the $1.3 million offered in 2019, over 70 percent of the proceeds are directed towards municipalities and schools.

“In the first full year of working with MCE, Pittsburg Unified School District has realized a $72,000 cash out from overproduction of our solar arrays district-wide, due to the 2019 Net Energy Metering Cash Out Program,” said Dr. Janet Schulze, Superintendent, Pittsburg Unified School District. “This was a win-win situation for us. Our solar arrays are in place and now we are gaining additional value for the energy we are producing beyond the needs of our schools.”

How MCE’s NEM Cash-Out Program Works

To calculate the amount of the cash out MCE customers receive, a meter tracks the net difference between the amount of electricity an MCE customer’s solar panels produce and the amount of electricity used during each billing month. When the panels produce more electricity than is used on-site, customers receive a credit on their bill that rolls over excess credits every month.

Most customers with solar panels in California are required to forfeit any surplus credits on their account each year through a ‘true-up’ process. MCE’s NEM program currently offers several innovative features, allowing customers who earn credits of $100 or more to cash out their full credit balance or simply roll the credits over into the following year — up to a maximum of $5,000. Customers with a credit below $100 will have their credit automatically rolled over.

###

EBCE Expands Its Renewable Energy and Storage Portfolio with Three New Contracts

Contracts include energy storage on low-income housing

Oakland, Calif. (July 17, 2019) – The East Bay Community Energy (EBCE) board of directors tonight approved another three agreements for 112 megawatts (MW) of power from a new solar facility, along with 7.5 MW of battery energy storage, to be built in Kern and Alameda Counties. The projects build upon 213.5 MW of new renewable energy projects and 50 MW of energy storage approved by the EBCE board through four contracts in June. The seven agreements combined total 325.5 MW of new renewable energy generation and 57.5 MW of energy storage. EBCE is a Community Choice Energy provider that serves most of Alameda County and is committed to increasing clean power within its local communities.

Two of the new agreements expand the Oakland Clean Energy Initiative (OCEI), which aims to replace the 40-year-old “Oakland Power Plant” in Jack London Square with clean energy resources. The two storage projects will provide EBCE with local resource adequacy – electricity-generating capacity that is available to serve demand.

One project will provide 7 MW of resource adequacy from energy storage through an agreement with esVolta, LP and is contingent on a joint purchasing effort with Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E). Another project with Sunrun, Inc. will be to develop several megawatts of solar and more than two megawatt-hours of batteries on more than 500 low-income housing units by 2022. This will deliver 500 kilowatts of grid reliability capacity to EBCE over a 10-year contracted period as a standalone agreement.

The EBCE and Sunrun project represents a leading example in the United States of home solar and battery systems directly contributing to the replacement of a retiring fossil fuel-fired power peaker plant.

The third agreement is a power purchase agreement (PPA) for 112 MW of solar energy from a new installation in Kern County. In addition to the solar PPA, the developer, Clearway Energy Group, has also agreed to offer EBCE an exclusive right to purchase output from a 43 MW wind project in Alameda County.

Below is a summary of the most recent agreements:

  • Oakland Clean Energy Initiative Project #2: 13-year agreement for 7 MW of energy storage in Oakland with California-based esVolta, LP
  • Oakland Clean Energy Initiative Project #3: 10-year agreement with San Francisco-based Sunrun for 0.5 MW of energy storage in and around Oakland drawn from new solar + storage installations on low-income housing
  • Rosamond Central Solar: 15-year agreement for 112 MW of solar energy in Kern County with San Francisco-based Clearway Energy Group, along with a right to purchase 43 MW of wind power from Alameda County

Randolph Mann, President of esVolta, said “Energy storage technology is helping enable California’s transition to a cleaner, lower carbon electricity system. We are proud to support EBCE’s innovative Oakland Clean Energy Initiative with a new battery project planned for the West Oakland neighborhood, which will provide emissions free power capacity and strengthen the local grid.”

“Sunrun is excited to partner with East Bay Community Energy to help pave the way towards a cleaner, more resilient and affordable energy system,” said Lynn Jurich, Sunrun co-founder and Chief Executive Officer. “Our company is built on the foundation that solar energy should be accessible to everyone, particularly those communities most impacted by pollution and which today lack access to clean energy. Shifting from an aging, dirty fossil fuel power plant to energy provided by home solar and batteries will ensure that West Oakland residents are at the center of the clean energy transition.”

In 2018, Sunrun established a goal to develop a minimum of 100 megawatts of solar on affordable multi-family housing, where 80% of tenants fall below 60% of the area median income, during the next decade in California. This project will support Sunrun’s goals while also further expanding access to clean solar energy and battery storage for low-income EBCE customers in Oakland and Alameda County.

“As California continues its push toward 100% clean energy, we’re thrilled to partner with CCAs like East Bay Community Energy that will play a crucial role in that transition,” said Craig Cornelius, CEO of Clearway Energy Group. “Rosamond Central Solar represents a huge step forward for the state’s clean energy and climate goals. We’re proud that this project will deliver affordable clean energy to the communities that EBCE serves.”

“California has critical goals for addressing climate change and these clean energy contracts are accelerating our progress towards reducing heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions on a shorter timeframe. Our communities are demanding meaningful change and EBCE is making that happen,” said EBCE Board Chair and Oakland City Councilmember Dan Kalb.

New agreements supplement a growing portfolio of renewable energy and storage projects across California, that are the result of a competitive solicitation run by EBCE to deliver on its promise to increase the use of renewable energy.

The agreements signed last month include:

  • Oakland Clean Energy Initiative Project #1: 10-year agreement for 20 MW of energy storage with Texas-based Vistra Energy
  • Summit Wind Project: 20-year agreement to purchase 57.5 MW of wind energy from the Altamont Winds LLC project near Livermore in Alameda County, from San Diego-based Salka LLC in partnership with a global private equity firm
  • Luciana Project: 15-year agreement to purchase 56 MW of solar energy from Japan-based Solar Frontier Americas for a project in Tulare County
  • Sonrisa Project: 20-year agreement to purchase 100 MW of solar energy and 30 MW of energy storage from EDPR CA Solar Park VI LLC in Fresno County, in partnership with Portugal-based EDP Renewables North America

EBCE is a not-for-profit public agency that operates a Community Choice Energy program for Alameda County and eleven incorporated cities, serving more than 550,000 residential and commercial customers throughout the county. EBCE initiated service in June 2018 and is one of 19 community choice aggregation (CCA) programs operating in California. CCAs are expediting the climate action goals of their communities and those of California.

Additional information from previous press releases can be found at these links:

###

About East Bay Community Energy (EBCE)
EBCE is the local electricity provider created by the votes of 11 City Councils and the County of Alameda Board of Supervisors to provide low cost, cleaner power to our community. Launching to residential customers in November 2018, EBCE joined 19 other Community Choice Energy programs operating across California. EBCE is committed to providing clean power at competitive rates while reinvesting in our local communities. For more information about East Bay Community Energy, visit https://ebce.org/.

About esVolta, LP
esVolta is a developer, owner and operator of utility-scale energy storage projects across North America. The company’s portfolio of operational plus contracted projects exceeds 500 MWh of capacity, and the firm is developing a large pipeline of future storage projects. esVolta has a strategic procurement arrangement with Powin Energy Corporation. More information about esVolta is available at www.esVolta.com.

About Sunrun
Sunrun (Nasdaq:RUN) is the nation’s largest residential solar, storage and energy services company. With a mission to create a planet run by the sun, Sunrun has led the industry since 2007 with its solar-as-a-service model, which provides clean energy to households with little to no upfront cost and at a saving compared to traditional electricity. The company designs, installs, finances, insures, monitors and maintains the systems, while families receive predictable pricing for 20 years or more. The company also offers a home solar battery service, Sunrun Brightbox, that manages household solar energy, storage and utility power. For more information, please visit: www.sunrun.com.

Final Enrollment Numbers Show SFPUC Has More Than Quadrupled CleanPowerSF Customers in Past Year

NEWS RELEASE

Contact:

Will Reisman

415-551-4346

wreisman@sfwater.org

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 2, 2019

Final Enrollment Numbers Show SFPUC Has More Than Quadrupled CleanPowerSF Customers in Past Year

376,000 customers in local energy program represent 360 percent increase from year prior, as enrollment numbers exceed expectations

 

San Francisco, CA— With the final enrollment of CleanPowerSF now officially completed, more than 376,000 businesses and residents are customers in the City’s local renewable energy program, marking a 360 percent increase from last year’s totals.

The program, which is operated by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC), provides renewable electricity services that are cheaper and cleaner than services offered by Pacific, Gas and Electric Company (PG&E).

“With our last major enrollment now officially completed, more people than ever in San Francisco are embracing safe, reliable and affordable electricity services through CleanPowerSF,” said SFPUC General Manager Harlan L. Kelly, Jr. “Our residents and businesses understand that meeting our City’s ambitious environmental goals requires action now. They are leading the path to a better tomorrow for San Francisco.”

CleanPowerSF began its fiscal year on July 1, 2018 with a total of 81,613 businesses and residents receiving CleanPowerSF service. Following the April enrollment period, which was the last and largest major rollout of CleanPowerSF, that total has risen to 376,119, more than a fourfold increase.

The 376,119 total customers exceeded the SFPUC’s initial projection of 360,000 customers, and the opt-out rate of 3.3 percent was below the agency’s 7 percent projection. As a Community Choice Aggregation program, residents and businesses are automatically enrolled in CleanPowerSF, although they can “opt-out” of the initiative.

Since it launched in 2016, CleanPowerSF has consistently offered a cleaner energy alternative to PG&E. In its initial year, CleanPowerSF’s Green product was 7 percent more renewable than the PG&E default product, and for the past two years, the Green service has been approximately 10 percent more renewable. Since its launch, CleanPowerSF’s energy procurement has effectively reduced the greenhouse gas emissions footprint of San Francisco’s electricity usage by 83% from 1990 levels, or the equivalent of removing about 134,000 passenger vehicles from the road for a year.

In addition to providing cleaner energy options, CleanPowerSF also saved those customers $3.5 million by delivering rates that are cheaper than the alternatives offered by PG&E.

Having access to a cheaper, greener energy product is a key priority of San Francisco residents. According to a poll conducted earlier this year, nearly 70 percent of respondents were in favor of the SFPUC delivering public power to the City, citing more affordable rates and cleaner energy alternatives as reasons for their support.

To create awareness about the CleanPowerSF program, the SFPUC sent out more than 1.1 million mailers to residents and businesses, contacted 130 organizations and hosted more than 30 meetings in communities and neighborhoods, along with engaging in targeted multi-lingual campaigns. Those efforts were in addition to the bi-monthly CleanPowerSF updates the agency delivered at SFPUC Commission meetings, which are open to the public and available to view live on SFGovTV.

Along with CleanPowerSF, the SFPUC operates the Hetch Hetchy Regional Power System, which provides 100 percent greenhouse gas free energy to public facilities, such as City Hall, San Francisco International Airport, Muni buses, schools and libraries. Collectively, the two systems meet approximately 80 percent of the electricity demand in San Francisco.

About the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) is a department of the City and County of San Francisco. It delivers drinking water to 2.7 million people in the San Francisco Bay Area, collects and treats wastewater for the City and County of San Francisco, and generates clean power for municipal buildings, residents, and businesses. Our mission is to provide our customers with high quality, efficient and reliable water, power, and sewer services in a manner that values environmental and community interests and sustains the resources entrusted to our care. Learn more at www.sfwater.org.

###

 

 

Clean Power Alliance Signs Three New Renewable Energy Power Purchase Agreements

Media Contact:

Allison Mannos, Senior Marketing Manager, Clean Power Alliance

(213) 595-7950 cell

amannos@cleanpoweralliance.org

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE—July 1, 2019

 

Clean Power Alliance Signs Three New Renewable Energy Power Purchase Agreements

New energy contracts totaling 285 megawatts will help meet state sustainability goals and create jobs 

Los Angeles, CA–Clean Power Alliance (CPA) signed three new competitively priced long-term power purchase agreements, including two new solar projects and one existing small hydroelectric project. The projects were approved by CPA’s Board of Directors at their June 28th board meeting.

All of the projects are located in Southern California in areas with low environmental impacts and specifically designated for renewable energy development. The projects will enable CPA to meet its customers’ renewable energy demand, lower costs, and comply with state renewable energy mandates. The two new solar facilities will create approximately 500 jobs, contracting well-paid and skilled workers to deliver on CPA’s mission to invest in a green energy workforce.

“These contracts demonstrate that Clean Power Alliance’s environmental commitments are translating into high impact investments and competitive pricing for our customers, while combatting climate change,” said Diana Mahmud, Board Chair of Clean Power Alliance and South Pasadena City Councilmember.

The first project contracts 233 megawatts from the Arlington Solar project in Riverside County, which will be owned and operated by a subsidiary of NextEra Energy Resources, LLC. That project will come on-line in two phases, with the first 100 MWAC delivered December 2021 and the next 133 MWAC delivered December 2022. It has an expected output of 718,220 MWh/year and a 15-year long contract.

The second project contracts 40 megawatts from Clearway Energy Group’s Rosamond Solar project in Kern County, beginning in March 2021. It has an expected output of 114,780 MWh/year and a 15-year long contract.

The last project contracts all of Isabella Partners’ existing 12 megawatt Isabella small hydroelectric project in Kern County, beginning in December 2020. It has an expected output of approximately 48,000 MWh/year and a 10-year long contract.

The projects resulted from CPA’s 2018 Clean Energy Request for Offers (RFO) and complement a long-term contract for the Terra-Gen owned Voyager wind project, executed in late 2018. CPA is negotiating additional long-term contracts from its 2018 Clean Energy RFO and will launch another Clean Energy RFO this coming fall.

CPA’s newly signed contracts follow a trend of Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) programs across the state exercising their buying power and driving new renewable energy development. Collectively to date, California’s CCAs have signed long-term renewable energy contracts for over 2000 megawatts.

“Our customers and the local governments who comprise Clean Power Alliance have overwhelmingly chosen competitively priced renewable energy options. These contracts will allow us to give our customers what they want while meeting California’s ambitious renewable energy goals ten years early,” said Natasha Keefer, Director of Power Planning and Procurement, Clean Power Alliance.

###

Clean Power Alliance believes in a clean energy future that is local, where communities are empowered, and customers are given a choice about the source of their energy. As of June 2019, Clean Power Alliance serves over one million customer accounts and has the most customers on 100% renewable energy rate plans than any other electricity company in the country. Visit www.cleanpoweralliance.org or call Clean Power Alliance at 888-585-3788 for more information.

 

 

EBCE Green Lights Over 155 MW of New Renewable Energy Projects and 30 MW of Energy Storage

Newly approved contracts to accelerate growth of renewable energy in California and help local communities achieve climate goals

Oakland, Calif. (June 19, 2019) – The East Bay Community Energy (EBCE) board of directors today approved two power purchase agreements for a combined 157.5-Megawatts (MW) from new wind and solar facilities, along with 30 MW of battery energy storage, to be built in Alameda and Fresno Counties.  EBCE is a Community Choice Energy provider that serves most of Alameda County and is committed to increasing clean power within its local communities.

The EBCE board approved the following contracts:

  • Summit Wind Project: 20-year agreement to purchase 57.5 MW of wind energy from the Altamont Winds LLC project near Livermore in Alameda County from San Diego-based Salka LLC in partnership with a global private equity firm
  • Sonrisa Solar Park: 20-year agreement to purchase 100 MW of solar energy and 30 MW of energy storage from the Sonrisa Solar Park in Fresno County, owned and will be operated by EDP Renewables North America

“More and more, communities want to aggressively address climate change and reducing the use of fossil fuels in our power mix is a big part of that. EBCE is adding new renewable energy generation capacity to the grid that will, in time, serve to phase out our reliance on fossil fuel while also stabilizing our energy costs,” said County Supervisor and EBCE Board Chair, Scott Haggerty.

The Summit Wind Project located in Altamont Pass near Livermore is located within EBCE’s territory and reflects the community choice provider’s commitment to invest in local, clean energy resources and deliver local benefits. The project will entail repowering (replacing) a former Altamont Pass wind farm which consisted of older less efficient wind turbines with ones that are state-of-the-art.

“The environmental and the economic benefits of wind energy have become evident to communities in California and across the country,” said Salka Chief Executive Officer Jiddu Tapia. “With no fuel costs and low operating expenses, wind power helps to reduce electricity costs, giving consumers a better choice for their energy dollar. Clean energy projects like this create local jobs and spur local investment while providing an affordable, dependable way for EBCE to meet its expanding power needs for years to come.”

“Energy storage plays an important role in creating a more flexible and reliable grid system, and EDP Renewables is pleased to partner with EBEC to ultimately bring its first renewable energy project coupled with storage online in North America,” said Miguel Prado, EDP Renewables North America CEO.  “Solar and wind energy projects that include a storage component are the way of the future in the clean energy sector, and EDPR looks forward to developing additional multi-technology projects to increase efficiency and provide greater balance in energy supply.”

Completion and operation of the Summit Wind Project is planned for late 2020. The repowering project will replace 569 one-hundred-kilowatt turbines with 23 modern turbines. Once completed, the repowered wind farm will generate more than 60 percent of its power for Alameda County during peak hours, including the afternoon and high-demand summer months, producing enough clean energy on average to power about 30,000 homes per year. Construction on the Sonrisa Project will begin as early as December 2021 and be operational in 2022. Both contracts are a result of a competitive solicitation and review process that was initiated in 2018.

The board’s approval of the two power purchase agreements (PPAs) brings the total tally of long-term contracts approved by EBCE this month to four. On June 5, the board approved a contract with Vistra Energy to receive resource adequacy capacity from a 20 MW battery energy storage project that is currently planned to be built as a partial replacement for an aging, fossil fuel-fired power plant located in the heart of Oakland. The board also gave a green light to a 56 MW solar PPA with Solar Frontier Americas to be located in Tulare County.

All told, EBCE has this month approved contracts totaling 213.5 MW with new California-based renewable energy facilities and 50 MW of energy storage, delivering on its commitment to drive the development of new clean energy resources and green jobs in Alameda County and beyond, and to address climate change by reducing energy-related greenhouse gas emissions.

EBCE is a not-for-profit public agency that operates a Community Choice Energy program for Alameda County and eleven incorporated cities, serving more than 550,000 residential and commercial customers throughout the county.

EBCE initiated service in June 2018 and is one of 19 community choice aggregation (CCA) programs operating in California. “The agency’s ability to contract for new renewable energy projects so soon after launch is an achievement for the agency and shows the strength of CCA programs throughout the state in furthering and expediting the climate action goals of their communities and those of California,” said Beth Vaughan, executive director of the California Community Choice Association.

###

About East Bay Community Energy (EBCE)
EBCE is the local electricity provider created by the votes of 11 City Councils and the County of Alameda Board of Supervisors to provide low cost, cleaner power to our community. Launching to residential customers in November 2018, EBCE joined 19 other Community Choice Energy programs operating across California. EBCE is committed to providing clean power at competitive rates while reinvesting in our local communities. For more information about East Bay Community Energy, visit https://ebce.org/.

About EDP Renewables (EDPR)
EDP Renewables North America LLC (“EDPR NA”) and its subsidiaries develop, construct, own, and operate wind farms and solar parks throughout North America.  Headquartered in Houston, Texas, with 48 wind farms, five solar parks, and 13 regional and development offices across North America, EDPR NA has developed more than 6,700 megawatts (MW) and operates more than 6,100 MW of renewable energy projects.  EDPR NA is owned by EDP Renováveis, S.A. (EDPR).  For more information, visit www.edprnorthamerica.com.

EDP Renewables (Euronext: EDPR) is a global leader in the renewable energy sector and the world’s fourth-largest wind energy producer.  With a sound development pipeline, first class assets, and market-leading operating capacity, EDPR has undergone exceptional development in recent years and is currently present in 14 markets (Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, France, Greece, Italy, Mexico, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, the UK, and the U.S.).  Energias de Portugal, S.A. (“EDP”), the principal shareholder of EDPR, is a global energy company and a leader in value creation, innovation, and sustainability.  EDP has been included in the Dow Jones Sustainability Index for 12 consecutive years.  For further information, visit www.edpr.com.

About Salka LLC
Salka LLC, founded in 2013, is a renewable energy company focused on creating the energy of tomorrow by developing, constructing, operating, and arranging financing for utility scale renewable energy projects today. Over the last decade, the San Diego-based Salka management team has developed, constructed and arranged financing for 11 different utility scale wind farms and solar plants resulting in over 1,000 megawatts of clean renewable energy located in both the United States and Canada. For more information, visit www.salkaenergy.com.

Read more here: https://ebce.org/ebce-green-lights-over-155-mw-of-new-renewable-energy-projects-and-30-mw-of-energy-storage/

East Bay Community Energy Approves RA Contract with Vistra Energy for New Battery Energy Storage Project, Paving Way for Shut Down of Fossil Fuel-Fired Power Plant in Oakland

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

June 5, 2019

Press Contact: Annie Henderson

ahenderson@ebce.org | 510-640-9681

 

East Bay Community Energy Approves Resource Adequacy Contract with
Vistra Energy for New Battery Energy Storage Project, Paving Way for
Shut Down of Fossil Fuel-Fired Power Plant in Oakland
Battery Storage Project Represents Major Step in Implementing Oakland Clean Energy Initiative

 

Oakland, Calif. – The East Bay Community Energy (EBCE) board of directors on June 5 approved a contract with Vistra Energy to receive resource adequacy capacity from a 20-megawatt (MW)/80-megawatt-hour (MWh) battery energy storage project that is currently planned to be built as a partial replacement for an aging, jet fuel-fired power plant located in the heart of Oakland. EBCE is a Community Choice Energy provider that serves most of Alameda County and is committed to increasing clean power within its local communities.

The board’s approval of the energy storage contract with Vistra represents a major step in a joint purchasing effort by EBCE and Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E), dubbed the Oakland Clean Energy Initiative (OCEI), which aims to replace the 40-year-old “Oakland Power Plant,” which was acquired by Vistra in 2018, with clean energy resources. The storage project will provide EBCE with local resource adequacy – electricity-generating capacity that is available to serve demand even under stressful system conditions – and is contingent on approval of a transmission-related reliability contract with PG&E.

“EBCE is thrilled to play a crucial role in securing the energy resources that are needed in downtown Oakland to support a cleaner, more reliable energy system,” said Dan Kalb, EBCE Vice-Chair and Oakland City Councilmember. “The project is one of the many ways EBCE is driving innovative solutions that address climate change and provide direct benefits to the people living in our communities.”

This is not the first energy storage project for Vistra in California. The company is also developing the largest energy storage system of its kind in the world in Moss Landing, California. “We are always looking for great partnerships that benefit the community, as well as our company,” said Curt Morgan, CEO of Vistra. “We’re proud to have the opportunity to provide Oakland residents with renewable power while supporting the community’s clean energy transition.”

The 165-MW Oakland Power Plant, located at 50 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, is designated a “Reliability-Must-Run” facility by the California Independent System Operator (CAISO), which means it is needed for local reliability. In 2018, CAISO approved a plan to replace the power plant with local clean energy
resources, including energy storage, energy efficiency, and electric system upgrades to ensure grid reliability is maintained.

The 10-year energy storage contract with Irving, Texas-based Vistra Energy resulted from a request for proposals (RFP) issued in June 2018. The contract will allow EBCE to meet its minimum target under the RFP, and the community choice provider anticipates signing additional contracts to exceed this volume. The standalone energy storage project will be located at the power plant site and is expected to begin commercial operation in January 2022.

“The Oakland Clean Energy Initiative will replace an old power plant with zero emission energy storage that will help to clean our air and improve our community’s health.” said Reverend Ken Chambers of West Side Missionary Baptist Church in Oakland and President/Founder of the Interfaith Council of Alameda County.
With a capacity of 20 MW/80 MWh, the energy storage system will charge by drawing electricity from the grid during off-peak hours, when demand is low, and then discharging electricity during peak hours to help maintain reliability in the Oakland area. “This new, energy storage project will be built in partnership with a local, union workforce and represents an important step forward in enabling a just transition from fossil fuels to clean energy resources.” Bob Dean IBEW Local 1245
At the June 5 meeting, the EBCE board also approved a 56-MW solar power purchase agreement (PPA) with Tokyo-based Solar Frontier Americas [link to SFA website and/or press release], which is also the result of a competitive solicitation. The PPA has a 15-year term, with construction expected to begin in 2020. The solar facility will be located in Tulare County.

###

About East Bay Community Energy East Bay Community Energy is a Community Choice Energy provider serving customers in Alameda County. Launched in 2018, EBCE serves approximately 550,000 electricity accounts in Albany, Berkeley, Dublin, Emeryville, Fremont, Hayward, Livermore, Oakland, Piedmont, San Leandro, Union City and Alameda County’s unincorporated areas. For more information about EBCE visit https://ebce.org/.

About Vistra Energy Vistra Energy (NYSE: VST) is a premier, integrated power company based in Irving, Texas, combining an innovative, customer-centric approach to retail with a focus on safe, reliable, and efficient power generation. Through its retail and generation businesses which include TXU Energy, Homefield Energy, Dynegy, and Luminant, Vistra operates in 12 states and six of the seven competitive markets in the U.S., with about 5,400 employees. Vistra’s retail brands serve approximately 2.9 million residential, commercial, and industrial customers across five top retail states, and its generation fleet totals approximately 41,000 megawatts of highly efficient generation capacity, with a diverse portfolio of natural gas, nuclear, coal, solar, and battery storage facilities. The company is currently developing the largest battery energy storage system of its kind in the world – a 300-MW/1,200-MWh system in Moss Landing, California. Learn more at www.vistraenergy.com

EBCE Repays $4.7 Million Startup Loan from Alameda County

After only eight months of operation, EBCE fully repaid its advance of start-up funding from Alameda County in the amount of $4.7 million.

County Supervisor and EBCE Board Chair, Scott Haggerty, a champion of EBCE since its inception, says “We’ve worked for many years on this effort to provide cleaner power to our local communities. This milestone shows the effectiveness of EBCE’s management and marks the start of an exciting transition to clean power.”

EBCE needed start-up resources in order to begin operations, and the County provided both start-up funding and staff support. The County Board of Supervisors originally approved the Community Choice Energy program in November 2016 and entered an agreement with EBCE in April 2017 to lend up to $5.5 million to the new agency.

EBCE is now operational, has a staff of 21, and is supplying power to over 550,000 residential and commercial customers throughout the County. To date, EBCE estimates it has saved customers over $5 million in electricity costs by offering lower rates for cleaner power. EBCE operates through revenue it receives from sales of electricity; it does not rely on any taxpayer funding.

At a meeting on February 26, several members of the EBCE Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer, Nick Chaset, presented the repayment and thanked the Board of Supervisors, the County Administrator, the Community Development Agency, and the Auditor’s office for their coordinated efforts and forward thinking in making community choice a reality in Alameda County.

Also in attendance were EBCE Directors Dianne Martinez (Emeryville Council Member), Lily Mei (Mayor of Fremont), Ed Hernandez (San Leandro Council Member), and Anne Olivia Eldred (EBCE Community Advisory Committee Chair).