Energy Justice for All

Comstock’s Magazine

Typically, marginalized communities aren’t valued as centers of economic output and growth, and they’re often overlooked when it comes to investing resources. Their neighborhoods are the sites of power plants that disproportionately pollute them. Members of these communities are often low-income and people of color, pay a higher-than-average percentage of their income for energy, and live in homes that lack weatherproofing and energy-saving appliances. They may be financially burdened with poor indoor and outdoor air quality, decreased overall health, and limited or no access to equitable improvements.

“People are calling for a more community-owned system, a democratic system where people weigh in and make decisions about the energy that they’re producing,” Sutterman says. The community choice aggregation energy model is taking hold in California. This model is still connected to and delivered through the grid, but is governed by local elected officials who determine the source of their constituents’ energy.

Read more here: Energy Justice for All | Comstock’s magazine (comstocksmag.com)

 

​Senator Anthony Portantino Honored by CalCCA with Champion Award for Clean Energy Leadership

Pasadena Journal

Senator Anthony J. Portantino (D – La Cañada Flintridge) received the California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) Champion Award this week for his steadfast efforts and leadership to combat climate change, support of long-term sustainable clean energy, and his authorship of Senate Bill 612.

“I want to thank CalCCA for this honor and for the important work they do,” stated Senator Portantino.  “As we collectively step up our efforts to position California as a world leader in fighting climate change, it’s important to continue reshaping the energy landscape. Local governments through CCAs and innovation are driving much of the changes we need to reach our climate goals.” he added.

Read more here: ​Senator Anthony Portantino Honored by CalCCA with Champion Award for Clean Energy Leadership – PASADENA / SAN GABRIEL VALLEY JOURNAL (pasadenajournal.com)

LA County electric utility to move to 100% renewable energy over 2-3 years

Spectrum News1

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to shift from 50% to 100% renewable energy for county facilities and Clean Power Alliance customers in unincorporated areas over the next two to three years.

Supervisor Sheila Kuehl, who recommended the shift, said it could cut related emissions by 6% and called it “the single most impactful action that this county can take to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions.”

Read more here: LA County electric utility to move to 100% renewable energy (spectrumnews1.com)

RCEA Interested in Encouraging Private Development of Small Hydro

California Energy Markets

Redwood Coast Energy Authority began yet another phase in its process of adding more small hydroelectric power to its portfolio by hosting an educational workshop on the topic Dec. 7.

RCEA’s Run-of-River Small Hydroelectric Power Webinar introduced the approach the California community choice aggregator is taking to increase its proportion of this resource and do so responsibly. The CCA is focusing on run-of-river projects on streams without anadromous fish populations, rather than hydro that requires a dam or other impoundment to operate.

Read more here: RCEA Interested in Encouraging Private Development of Small Hydro | Regional Roundup | newsdata.com

California Community Choice Aggregator Earns “A” Credit Rating From S&P

Public Power Daily 

California community choice aggregator (CCA) East Bay Community Energy (EBCE) has been given an “A” issuer credit rating from S&P Global Ratings.

S&P cited EBCE’s solid financial performance. At fiscal year-end 2021, EBCE had no debt outstanding.

The rating agency also said that EBCE’s environmental risk exposure is low, based on its predominantly carbon-free resource portfolio.

Read more here: California Community Choice Aggregator Earns “A” Credit Rating From S&P | American Public Power Association

California nonprofits issue $2 billion in bonds to buy 30 years of renewable energy upfront

Utility Dive

Three community choice aggregators (CCA) in California issued $2 billion in bonds to pay upfront for about 450 MW of renewable energy over 30 years.

By routing bonds to purchase clean energy through the California Community Choice Financing Authority (CCCFA), the three public energy suppliers expect to save 8-12% on the cost of energy. The financial structure of the transaction will allow the CCAs to take advantage of both bulk energy discounts and the difference between taxable and tax-exempt rates, according to Garth Salisbury, director of finance and treasurer for MCE, a CCA that provides power to 37 San Francisco Bay Area communities.

Read more here: California nonprofits issue $2 billion in bonds to buy 30 years of renewable energy upfront | Utility Dive

CCAs Leading on Clean Energy Acquisitions

California Current

Four community choice aggregators’ displayed their strategies for accelerating their clean energy portfolios to surpass state goals and meet local needs at the California Community Choice Association’s annual conference earlier this month.

Central Coast Community Energy and Clean Power San Francisco intend to reach 100% renewable energy by 2025, while Peninsula Clean Energy plans to do so by 2030. All three are ahead of the state’s 2045 energy decarbonization target. The Clean Power Alliance expects 19 of its 32 member communities to be 100% in 2022.

Read more here: CCAs Leading on Clean Energy Acquisitions – California Current (cacurrent.com)

Climate change — hope for how to (literally) save the world

The Hill

States have made incredible strides in climate policy. California, an international leader, has committed $15 billion over the next three years to address climate change, including drought and wildfires, climate resilience, zero emission vehicles, and new renewable energy sources. To date, 10 states have set clean or renewable portfolio standards at 100 percent by between 2030 and 2050. These states are leading the way, creating a massive demand for clean energy, and moving markets. One study found that in the U.S., investments in clean energy yielded more than double the return for fossil fuels.

States that enact policies like community choice aggregation (CCA), which allows cities to band together to negotiate lower rates and more renewables from their utility providers, are also having a big impact. CCA is a powerful tool that can help push utilities to increase renewable portfolios.

Read more here: Climate change — hope for how to (literally) save the world | TheHill

An introduction to energy’s hottest new trend: 24/7 carbon-free electricity

Volts

When a company or city claims to be “100 percent powered by clean energy,” what it typically means is that it has tallied up its electricity consumption, purchased an equal amount of carbon-free energy (CFE), and called it even.

That’s fine, as far as it goes. But now, the next horizon of voluntary climate action has come into view: a brave few companies and cities aspire, not just to offset their consumption with CFE on a yearly basis, but to match their consumption with CFE production every hour of every day, all year long. Running on clean energy 24/7 — that’s new hotness.

The list of entities in the US that have committed to 24/7 CFE is short: Peninsula Clean Energy (a community choice aggregator in California) has committed to it by 2025; Google, Microsoft, and the Sacramento Municipal Utility District have targeted 2030; the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and, somewhat anomalously for this California-heavy list, the city of Des Moines, Iowa, have targeted 2035. Ithaca, New York, is rumored to be contemplating something similar.

Read more here: An introduction to energy’s hottest new trend: 24/7 carbon-free electricity (volts.wtf)

Equity Through Energy: How the East Bay is becoming the heart of inclusive energy

East Bay Express

Despite pandemic woes and ruthless extreme weather events, from wildfires to droughts, the East Bay makes great strides in keeping communities resilient—in large part by spurring our districts to embrace clean technologies. Equally important, we have made significant progress in broadening access to these technologies and clean energy resources for more residents across the region.

At East Bay Community Energy—a local public power agency providing greener energy, low rates and local benefits—we think of this current era as one defined by “inclusive energy,” in which our community members are not just “ratepayers” but partners on this collective journey to a more sustainable future. Within our own agency’s DNA, our community members’ needs are deeply interconnected; when customers reach out to us, we’re there for them. At the same time, we proactively engage with customers to find ways to extend the value and benefits of renewables to some of the East Bay’s most sensitive, but traditionally overlooked, neighborhoods.

Read more here: Equity Through Energy: How the East Bay is becoming the heart of inclusive energy | East Bay Express | Oakland, Berkeley & Alameda