Community choice electricity providers say time has come for PG&E to move out of retail energy business—and be restructured as “wires-only” company

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: February 14, 2019
Press Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel
(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

Community choice electricity providers say time has come for PG&E to move out of

retail energy business—and be restructured as “wires-only” company

To improve safety and reliability, Northern California CCAs urge regulators to focus PG&E on improving its transmission and distribution system—while empowering local governments to procure affordable, clean energy for their communities

Concord, Calif.– In a new filing with the California Public Utilities Commission, community choice aggregators (CCAs) from Northern California urged state regulators to take action to restructure PG&E as a “wires-only” company—moving the utility out of the retail energy business so PG&E management can focus on safely managing the company’s transmission and distribution system, which has been the source of billions of dollars in damage to communities across the state, while empowering CCAs to continue doing their part to meet California’s clean energy goals by serving all members of their communities.

“PG&E’s first bankruptcy in 2001 resulted in the creation of community choice aggregation to serve as a tool to maintain the stability, affordability, and sustainability of California’s electricity system, and with the utility poised to enter yet another bankruptcy, the time has come to expand this approach,” said Beth Vaughan, executive director of the California Community Choice Association (CalCCA). “The joint CCAs strongly endorse a restructuring that allows PG&E to focus where safety improvements are needed most—delivering electricity across the energy grid—while allowing locally-controlled public agencies to safely, reliably, and cost-effectively purchase the energy Californians rely on.”

The CCAs’ recommendations come on the heels of an announcement by Governor Newsom on January 12 that he has created a team to develop a “comprehensive strategy” for updating California’s utility system to better adapt to the rapidly evolving energy market that includes community choice providers. “More and more of our electricity now is procured outside of investor-owned utilities,” the governor said in his State of the State address. “Regulations and insurance practices created decades ago didn’t anticipate these changes. We must map out a longer-term framework, not just for the utilities’ future, but for California’s energy future, to ensure that the cost of climate change doesn’t fall on those least able to afford it.”

The group of CCAs provided a set of detailed recommendations for how the State can build a stronger, greener, and more reliable electric system in their proposals to the California Public Utilities Commission, which has been leading an investigation since 2015 into whether PG&E’s organizational culture and governance adequately prioritize safety. The Commission’s investigation recently expanded to include consideration of the future of PG&E, in light of PG&E’s bankruptcy and the need to improve the safety of its operations after State investigators found PG&E to be responsible for some of California’s worst wildfires.

In comments submitted on behalf of the East Bay Community Energy, Peninsula Clean Energy Authority, Pioneer Community Energy, the City of San José (for San José Clean Energy), Silicon Valley Clean Energy, Sonoma Clean Power, and Valley Clean Energy Alliance, the CCAs highlight four goals for the Commission as it considers opportunities for restructuring PG&E:

  • Improve PG&E’s electric infrastructure safety outcomes by removing PG&E from the retail generation business and concentrating PG&E’s attention and investments on its electric transmission and distribution businesses.
  • Put financial stewardship, responsibility, and control over programs such as demand response, energy efficiency and transportation electrification under local control.
  • Provide communities the opportunity and authority to take affordable clean energy action by ensuring communities have the unhindered ability to proactively pursue full community control of retail generation services through a variety of local governance models. The Commission should work collaboratively with local governments to remove barriers to pursuing full municipalization of the electric system in communities where there is interest.
  • Transform California’s regulatory and legislative framework to concentrate on safety while utilizing existing locally governed, state, or non-profit platforms whenever possible, or new state or non-profit entities, if necessary, to enhance transparency, accountability, and reliability.

“CalCCA and the joint CCAs look forward to working with the Commission and other parties to identify the best path forward for providing Northern California with safe and reliable electric and gas service—at just and reasonable rates,” Vaughan said.

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About CalCCA

Launched in 2016, the California Community Choice Association represents California’s community choice electricity providers before the state Legislature and at regulatory agencies, advocating for a level playing field and opposing policies that unfairly discriminate against CCAs and their customers. There are currently 19 operational CCA programs in California serving an estimated 10 million customers.

For more information about CalCCA, visit www.cal-cca.org.

 

PG&E Bankruptcy Filing 2019: FAQs

PG&E Bankruptcy Filing 2019
CalCCA’s Responses to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

With Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) facing billions of dollars in potential wildfire liabilities the investor-owned utility on January 29 filed for protection under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. Community Choice Aggregators (CCAs) are committed to providing reliable service, clean energy at competitive rates, and innovative programs that benefit people, the environment and the economy in communities across California. CCAs are closely monitoring the situation and continue to work closely with PG&E in a coordinated manner to address any potential impacts of the bankruptcy filing on CCA programs. Here are answers to common bankruptcy-related questions that we’ve received:

Q. What is Pacific Gas & Electric’s role when it comes to CCAs in California?
A. PG&E is responsible for providing transmission and distribution services to CCA customers (delivering power) as well as serving as billing agent for CCAs. CCAs provide power generation services and are independently responsible for securing sufficient electricity supplies to meet the needs of their customers. CCA customers receive a consolidated bill issued by PG&E that includes charges from both parties. PG&E collects payments on behalf of the CCA, and these payments are then transferred to the CCA. PG&E is legally required to continue to perform as the billing agent for CCAs.

Q. How many CCAs operate in PG&E’s service territory?
A. There are 12 CCAs serving customers in PG&E’s territory. They are: CleanPowerSF, East Bay Community Energy, King City Community Power, MCE, Monterey Bay Community Power, Peninsula Clean Energy, Pioneer Community Energy, Redwood Coast Energy Authority, San Jose Clean Energy, Silicon Valley Clean Energy, Sonoma Clean Power, and Valley Clean Energy.

Q. What percentage of PG&E load is served by CCAs?
A. Approximately 41 percent of PG&E’s load will be served by CCAs in 2019. Approximately 25 percent of the load of all three investor-owned utilities (PG&E, Southern California Edison and San Diego Gas & Electric) will be served by CCAs in 2019.

Q. What will happen to my electricity service?
A. It’s expected PG&E will continue to operate in a business-as-usual fashion and that the lights will stay on. This was the case when PG&E filed for bankruptcy protection in 2001.

Q. Has PG&E’s current situation resulted in any impacts to CCA programs in California?
A. CCAs are continuing to serve their customers with electricity supply as usual.

Q. Will there be additional fees added to rates to pay for the wildfires?
A. Any additional fees to pay for PG&E’s wildfire liabilities would need to be considered by its regulator, the California Public Utilities Commission, and possibly the California Legislature and bankruptcy court. We cannot speculate about future impacts to rates.

Q. Do CCAs support a ‘breakup’ of PG&E?
A. The California Public Utilities Commission is investigating PG&E’s current corporate governance, management, and structure to determine the best path forward for Northern Californians to receive safe energy service. CCAs are committed to working with the State of California to ensure the stability of the retail electricity market and stand ready to engage on next steps while providing community-responsive clean and reliable electrical service.

Q. Some have been calling for a public takeover (municipalization) of PG&E. Are CCAs interested in acquiring PG&E’s infrastructure?
A. Some jurisdictions that operate CCA programs may investigate municipalization, while others may want to remain focused on providing generation services only. There is no one-size-fits-all approach. Some civic leaders have called on their local utilities commission to explore municipalization.

Q. Has the court ruled on PG&E’s first-day motion seeking approval to continue providing CCA services?
A. Yes. On January 29, PG&E filed a first-day motion seeking the Bankruptcy Court’s approval to continue passing through CCA revenues in the ordinary course of business. Under this motion, the CCA revenue that PG&E collects as the legally-required billing agent for CCAs would not be encumbered by the bankruptcy process.

On January 31, Judge Montali granted PG&E’s interim motion authorizing PG&E to continue to pass through CCA revenues in the ordinary course of business. This order allowed PG&E to resume the flow of revenues to CCAs. The court is expected to finalize this order on February 27. We agree with PG&E that “the normal and uninterrupted remittance” of customer payments to CCAs and other public-purpose programs is of the utmost importance.

Q. When will the remittance of customer payments to CCAs resume?
A. The remittance of customer payments to CCAs was briefly halted by the court as part of the normal bankruptcy review process. PG&E has resumed all billing and revenue remittance services to CCAs and we expect these to continue without interruption.

Q. Are CCAs actively participating in the bankruptcy court proceedings?
A. Yes. Sonoma Clean Power filed statements to ensure the ongoing pass-through of CCA revenues. CleanPowerSF, EBCE, San Jose, SVCE, MBCP, Pioneer and VCE signed on in support. MCE and PCE have filed individual statements that support the SCP motion.

Q. What are CCAs’ contract exposure with PG&E?
A. Each CCA in PG&E’s service territory has a legally-required Service Agreement. PG&E filed a first-day motion to continue those services to CCAs. On January 31 Judge Montali granted preliminary approval of the motion. The court is expected to finalize this order on February 27.

Some CCAs have contracts to buy energy products from PG&E. Since those energy contracts provide revenue to PG&E, we expect those to remain in place. Some CCAs also have contracts for state-authorized energy efficiency (public purpose program) funding that PG&E is authorized to collect and pass through to the CCAs. PG&E has also requested that these funds continue to flow in the ordinary course of business. We are optimistic that these funds will continue to flow normally.

PDF of this document:  CalCCA FAQs PG&E Bankruptcy 2.8.19

CalCCA Response to PG&E Filing for Bankruptcy Protection

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: January 29, 2019
Press Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel
(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

CalCCA Response to PG&E Filing for Bankruptcy Protection

Concord, Calif. – Today, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) filed for protection under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) has issued the following response:

Community Choice Aggregators (CCAs) are continuing to work closely with PG&E in a coordinated manner to address any potential impacts of the bankruptcy filing on CCA programs.

We support PG&E’s first-day motion seeking the Bankruptcy Court’s approval to continue passing through CCA revenues in the ordinary course of business. We agree with PG&E that “the normal and uninterrupted remittance” of customer payments to CCAs and other public-purpose programs is of the utmost importance.

We are optimistic that PG&E will continue to provide all billing and revenue remittance services to CCAs in a business-as-usual fashion. Some CCAs have contracts to buy energy products from PG&E. Since those energy contracts provide revenue to PG&E, we expect those to remain in place.

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About CalCCA: Launched in 2016, the California Community Choice Association represents California’s community choice electricity providers before the state Legislature and at regulatory agencies, advocating for a level playing field and opposing policies that unfairly discriminate against CCAs and their customers. There are currently 19 operational CCA programs in California serving an estimated 8 million customers.

For more information about CalCCA, visit www.cal-cca.org.

 

New CalCCA Hires to Focus on Legislative, Strategic Initiatives

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: January 28, 2019
Press Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel
(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

New CalCCA Hires to Focus on Legislative, Strategic Initiatives
Addition of MacNeil and Pappas Bolsters CalCCA’s Presence in Sacramento

Concord, Calif. – The California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) is pleased to announce that Sean MacNeil and Nick Pappas have joined CalCCA in the newly-established roles of Director of Legislative Affairs and Director of Strategic Initiatives and Outreach, respectively. Their extensive public policy and utility sector experience will significantly enhance CalCCA’s efforts to support the growth and long-term sustainability of Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) in California.

“Sean’s and Nick’s wealth of experience working on energy matters in the California Legislature and with key energy market stakeholders will bolster CalCCA’s ability to advance and protect community choice, which is playing an ever more critical role in California’s clean energy future,” said CalCCA Executive Director Beth Vaughan.

CalCCA’s new Director of Legislative Affairs, Sean MacNeil, is a public policy veteran with a strong background in energy, environmental, labor, and local government policies. Sean began his career as legislative aide for Assemblymember Helen Thomson, and subsequently served as chief of staff for the following California Senate and Assembly members: Patricia Wiggins, Noreen Evans, Michael Allen and, for the last six years, Richard Bloom. In Bloom’s office, Sean managed a staff of ten and served as liaison between Bloom and elected officials, lobbyists and advocacy groups.

Sean will serve as the head of all legislative matters for CalCCA. In that capacity, he will work closely with statewide representatives and decision-makers at the California Legislature, develop and lead the CalCCA legislative agenda, and direct and oversee representation of CalCCA before local and state representatives and the Legislature.

CalCCA’s new Director of Strategic Initiatives and Outreach, Nick Pappas, began his career as a staffer in Assemblymember Nathan Fletcher’s office, focusing on energy and climate legislation and impacts to residential rate design, net energy metering, and cap and trade, among other issues. Nick subsequently worked as a senior legislative advocate at Southern California Edison where he developed and executed strategies on a broad suite of policy issues ranging from energy procurement and customer programs to emissions regulation and distribution reliability. Since 2016, Nick has been a dual MS student at UC Davis in the Energy Systems and Agricultural and Resource Economics programs.

Nick will develop and manage various initiatives aimed at supporting the continued development and success of CCA, with particular emphasis on identifying and facilitating strategies for multi-jurisdictional and long-term industry issues and trends, as well as expanding the CCA community’s engagement with other energy industry stakeholders. Nick will also work with CalCCA leadership to Identify critical policy issues facing the CCA community and develop potential pathways for resolution.

Sean and Nick are based in CalCCA’s new Sacramento office.

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About CalCCA: Launched in 2016, the California Community Choice Association represents California’s community choice electricity providers before the state Legislature and at regulatory agencies, advocating for a level playing field and opposing policies that unfairly discriminate against CCAs and their customers. There are currently 19 operational CCA programs in California serving an estimated 8 million customers.

For more information about CalCCA, visit www.cal-cca.org.

CalCCA Statement on PG&E Bankruptcy Announcement

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: January 14, 2019

Press Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel

(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org 

 

Concord, Calif. – With Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) facing billions of dollars in potential wildfire liabilities the investor-owned utility has announced it is on the verge of filing for protection under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. Today, the California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) issued the following statement:

“Community Choice Aggregators (CCAs) are committed to providing reliable service, clean energy at competitive rates, and innovative programs that benefit people, the environment and the economy in communities across California. They are closely monitoring any developments related to PG&E’s financial situation and are in the process of evaluating potential impacts on CCA customers and operations.”

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About CalCCA: The California Community Choice Association supports the development and long-term sustainability of locally-run Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) electricity providers in California. There are currently 19 operational CCA programs in California serving an estimated 8 million customers.

For more information about CalCCA, visit www.cal-cca.org.

California CCAs Seek Rehearing of CPUC’s Inequitable ‘Exit Fee’ Decision

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 11.19.18

Press Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel

(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

 

California CCAs Seek Rehearing of CPUC’s Inequitable ‘Exit Fee’ Decision

Decision thwarts competition by shifting avoidable costs to community choice customers

 

Concord, Calif. – The California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) and two of the state’s community choice aggregators, CleanPowerSF and Solana Energy Alliance, filed an application for rehearing today with the California Public Utilities Commission in response to the CPUC’s October 11 decision to revise the Power Charge Indifference Adjustment (PCIA).

The PCIA is an “exit fee” charged by the state’s investor-owned utilities (IOUs) to community choice aggregation (CCA) and other departing load customers to compensate for electricity generation built or contracted in the past at prices that are now above-market. The CPUC’s decision is expected to result in a sharp increase in PCIA rates for CCA customers and may make it uneconomic for new CCAs to launch.

“The PCIA decision fails to ensure equitable treatment of all market participants in California,” said Beth Vaughan, executive director of CalCCA. “It favors incumbent utilities by shifting costs, including recovery of shareholder returns, from IOU bundled customers to CCA customers.”

In the application, the CCA parties request that the Commission correct a number of legal errors in the PCIA decision that run afoul of the California Public Utilities Code, California Code of Civil Procedure, as well as other statutes. The errors include:

  • Failing to exclude the costs of utility-owned generation (UOG) in the PCIA imposed on CCA departing load customers
  • Failing to reduce the net PCIA portfolio costs of the IOUs by the value of any benefits that remain with bundled service customers
  • Failing to exclude from the PCIA portfolio costs that are not “unavoidable” or “attributable to” departing load customers

The parties are seeking expedited review of the application on the basis that the decision will in some cases result in PCIA rates that prevent CCAs from serving their customers at the same total generation rates that an IOU can charge its customers. The PCIA rates may also cause CCAs to suspend or cancel the launch of service to new customers.

There are 19 CCA programs serving approximately 8 million customers in California. The higher PCIA rates will have local as well as statewide impacts, particularly when it comes to energy decarbonization. CCAs have signed long-term contracts with new renewable energy facilities totaling more than 2,000 megawatts, and they serve their customers with electricity that is cost-competitive, and in many cases greener, with the supplies of investor-owned utilities.

As UCLA’s Luskin Center for Innovation notes in a 2018 study, “the rise of CCAs has had both direct and indirect positive effects on overall renewable energy consumed in California, leading the state to meet its 2030 RPS targets approximately ten years in advance.”

The precise effects of the new PCIA on 2019 rates will ultimately depend on the outcome of Energy Resource Recovery Account proceedings that are now underway at the CPUC. ERRA proceedings are where the PCIA methodology is combined with an IOU’s actual cost and contract data to calculate the PCIA that will go into effect at the beginning of each year (January 1).

CalCCA is preparing for Phase 2 of the PCIA proceeding and remains undeterred in its efforts to support a new PCIA that lowers costs for all consumers and fosters a competitive environment that offers communities more energy options.

PDF of Press Release: CalCCA Application for Rehearing 11.19.18

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About CalCCA: The California Community Choice Association supports the development and long-term sustainability of locally-run Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) electricity providers in California. CalCCA is the authoritative, unified voice of local CCAs, offering expertise on local energy issues while promoting fair competition, consumer choice and cost allocation and recognizing the social and economic benefits of localized energy authorities.

For more information visit www.cal-cca.org.

California CCAs Achieve 2,000-Megawatt Milestone for New Renewables

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 11.15.18

Press Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel

(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

 

California CCAs Achieve 2,000-Megawatt Milestone for New Renewables

Long-term clean energy contract commitments by CCAs double in one year

 

Concord, Calif. – The California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) is pleased to announce that community choice aggregators (CCAs) in the state have signed long-term contracts with new renewable energy facilities totaling more than 2,000 megawatts (MW), reflecting a strong commitment by CCAs to drive clean energy and economic development in California and help the state achieve ambitious decarbonization and climate change goals.

CCAs achieved the 2,000 MW milestone in October when Monterey Bay Community Power (MBCP) and Silicon Valley Clean Energy (SVCE) approved power purchase agreements (PPAs) totaling 278 MW of solar coupled with 340 megawatt hours (MWh) of battery storage for two separate projects, to be built in Kern and Kings Counties. In 2017, CCAs in California had secured approximately 1,000 MW of new renewables under long-term contracts, so the figure has doubled in one year.

“This is a significant achievement for the CCA movement in California. It shows CCAs are ready, willing and able to sign long-term contracts with new renewable energy projects, fueling new sources of clean energy, job creation and revenues for host communities,” said Beth Vaughan, executive director of CalCCA.

California’s aggregators have signed a total of 59 PPAs with new solar, wind, biogas, and energy storage facilities, supporting billions of dollars in construction and thousands of jobs. All but three of the contracts are for terms of ten years or longer.

The renewable energy projects are located in 16 California counties – from Mendocino County in the north to Riverside County in the south, with one located in New Mexico. Several projects are already operating, while others will become operational between 2019 and 2021. A map of project locations and a list of contracts can be found here: CalCCA Renewable Energy Map. The table below includes a sampling of projects:

 

CCA* Project MW Type County PPA Term (yrs)
PCE Wright Solar Park 200 Solar Merced 25
MCE Little Bear Solar 160 Solar Fresno 20
MBCP/SVCE RE Slate 1 150/45 Solar/Storage Kings 15
MBCP/SVCE Big Beau Solar 128/40 Solar/Storage Kern 20
CPSF San Pablo Raceway 100 Solar Los Angeles 22
SCP Sand Hill C 80 Wind Alameda 20
LCE Western Antelope Dry Ranch 10 Solar Los Angeles 20

* Peninsula Clean Energy (PCE), MCE, Monterey Bay Community Power (MBCP), Silicon Valley Clean Energy (SVCE), CleanPowerSF (CPSF), Sonoma Clean Power (SCP), Lancaster Choice Energy (LCE)

Marin Clean Energy (MCE) initiated service in 2010 becoming the first operational CCA in California. There are now 19 CCAs serving approximately 8 million customers in the state and momentum is building. Ten CCAs launched in 2018 alone and many more are under development.

Despite their newness, CCAs are viewed as reliable and stable counterparties and are proving adept at securing cost-effective, long-term power resources. As a result, CCAs are able to serve their customers with electricity that is cost-competitive, and in many cases greener, with the supplies of investor-owned utilities.

“A key aspect of the value proposition offered by MCE and other California CCAs is the requirement that renewable and clean energy be a major component of the customers’ power supply mix,” Moody’s Investor Services said upon assigning MCE an investment grade credit rating in May. “This value is one of the most significant factors that provides strength to the long-term business model.”

As more CCAs begin procuring long-term resources, investments in new clean energy facilities will intensify. Clean Power Alliance and East Bay Community Energy, launched in 2018, are among the CCAs that are currently evaluating developers’ offers for new renewables projects in California. This fact sheet provides additional information on CCA power purchasing.

PDF version of this press release is here:  CCAs Achieve 2000 Megawatt Milestone

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About CalCCA: The California Community Choice Association supports the development and long-term sustainability of locally-run Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) electricity providers in California. CalCCA is the authoritative,

unified voice of local CCAs, offering expertise on local energy issues while promoting fair competition, consumer choice and cost allocation and recognizing the social and economic benefits of localized energy authorities.

For more information visit www.cal-cca.org.

CalCCA Statement on the Advancement of Community Choice Aggregation in San Diego

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 25, 2018
Press Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel
(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

 

Concord, Calif. – The California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) has issued the following statement by Executive Director Beth Vaughan in response to the City of San Diego’s announcement that it is moving forward with community choice aggregation (CCA):

“The California Community Choice Association welcomes San Diego’s selection of community choice aggregation as the preferred pathway to reach the city’s 100 percent renewable energy goal. The association appreciates San Diego’s careful consideration of CCA as a means to address climate change, provide residents and businesses with a choice of energy providers, and reduce costs for ratepayers. There are 19 CCA programs operating successfully throughout California and we look forward to more communities joining this exciting movement.”

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About CalCCA: The California Community Choice Association supports the development and long-term sustainability of locally-run Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) electricity providers in California. CalCCA is the authoritative, unified voice of local CCAs, offering expertise on local energy issues while promoting fair competition, consumer choice and cost allocation and recognizing the social and economic benefits of localized energy authorities. There are currently 19 operational CCA programs in California serving an estimated 8 million customers in 2018.

For more information about CalCCA, visit www.cal-cca.org.

CalCCA Statement on CPUC Approval of Controversial ‘Exit Fee’ Reforms

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 11, 2018

Press Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel

(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

CalCCA Statement on CPUC Approval of Controversial ‘Exit Fee’ Reforms

Commission Decision Shifts Costs to Departing Load Customers

Concord, Calif. – The California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) today released the following statement from Beth Vaughan, executive director of CalCCA, after the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) voted to approve controversial revisions to the Power Charge Indifference Adjustment (PCIA).

“CalCCA is very disappointed that the Commission approved changes to the PCIA that favor the investor-owned utilities and will stifle competition from locally-run CCAs,” Vaughan said. “However, we remain undeterred in our efforts to support a new PCIA that lowers costs for all consumers and fosters a competitive environment that offers communities more energy options. We will consider all avenues going forward.”

The PCIA is an “exit fee” charged by the state’s investor-owned utilities (IOUs) to CCA and other departing load customers to compensate for electricity generation built or contracted in the past at prices that are now above-market.

Today’s action by the CPUC will result in a sharp increase in PCIA rates for CCA customers. This devastating blow to the flourishing CCA movement in California could deter further market entry by CCAs.  At a minimum, the action will impair CCAs’ abilities to accelerate the state’s decarbonization and economic justice policy goals and to better tailor electric service to meet the needs of local communities.

CalCCA thanks Administrative Law Judge Stephen Roscow for putting forth common sense, legally-supportable reforms to the PCIA based on the hearing record, that would have provided a more balanced result. The rejection of Roscow’s proposal by the Commission is at the expense of both CCA and IOU ratepayers in California.

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About CalCCA: The California Community Choice Association supports the development and long-term sustainability of locally-run Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) electricity providers in California. CalCCA is the authoritative, unified voice of local CCAs, offering expertise on local energy issues while promoting fair competition, consumer choice and cost allocation and recognizing the social and economic benefits of localized energy authorities. There are currently 19 operational CCA programs in California serving an estimated 8 million customers in 2018.

For more information about CalCCA, visit www.cal-cca.org.

Press release is here.

CalCCA Issues Report on CCA Efforts to Advance Equity and Diversity in Local Communities

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 5, 2018
Press Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel
(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

CalCCA Issues Report on CCA Efforts to Advance Equity and Diversity in Local Communities

Concord, Calif. – The California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) has issued a new report that details efforts by the state’s Community Choice Aggregators (CCAs) to advance equity and diversity through their procurement, policy and program activities. The report’s release coincided with the California Public Utilities Commission’s Supplier Diversity En Banc, held on October 4 in Richmond.

The report, titled “Beyond Supplier Diversity,” highlights CCA initiatives that align with the intent and spirit of General Order (GO) 156, the CPUC’s Utility Supplier Diversity Program. The program monitors supplier diversity in procurements by participating utilities and oversees a clearinghouse of women; minority; lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT); and disabled veteran-owned business enterprises.

CalCCA Executive Director Beth Vaughan and MCE Chief Executive Officer Dawn Weisz participated in a panel at the En Banc which focused on emerging energy markets. They highlighted the steps CCAs are taking to ensure their operations are inclusive of diverse groups, such as those targeted in the GO 156 program.

CalCCA’s Environmental Justice and Equity Working Group compiled the report after surveying CCAs to find out what they are doing to promote economic development in diverse communities.

“We asked, what are the CCAs doing to ensure access, inclusion, and representation of underrepresented sectors in the core business of CCAs, that of clean energy,” Vaughan said at the En Banc.

CCA programs and activities featured in the report vary widely, from the creation of community advisory committees and local development business plans to the funding of grants to enable community engagement and local workforce development initiatives.

“In their role as public, not-for-profit agencies, CCAs share a commitment to inclusion and representation of our diverse communities through democratic governance and intensive community engagement,” the report notes.

The working group is evaluating CCA diversity activities to establish best practices that can be shared within CalCCA’s membership and with external stakeholders. CalCCA also plans to host a CCA supplier diversity symposium next year in Southern California. The first symposium, co-hosted by CalCCA and the Greenlining Institute, was held in January 2018 in Richmond.

The full report is available here.

 

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About CalCCA: The California Community Choice Association supports the development and long-term sustainability of locally-run Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) electricity providers in California. CalCCA is the authoritative, unified voice of local CCAs, offering expertise on local energy issues while promoting fair competition, consumer choice and cost allocation and recognizing the social and economic benefits of localized energy authorities. There are currently 19 operational CCA programs in California serving an estimated 8 million customers in 2018.

 

For more information about CalCCA, visit www.cal-cca.org.