CalCCA Statement on Passage of SB 350 (Golden State Energy Act)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 6.29.2020
Press Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel
(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

CalCCA Statement on Passage of SB 350

The California Community Choice Association appreciates the state’s efforts, through the passage of SB 350, the Golden State Energy Act, to ensure that a “Plan B” is in place should PG&E fail to exit bankruptcy, and/or fail in its safety performance under the terms of an enhanced oversight and enforcement process adopted by the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC). We share the state’s desire to see PG&E regain its financial footing, fully compensate wildfire victims, and embrace a culture that is hyper-focused on the safety of its electric system and the people of California. At the same time, we encourage the state to support local government efforts to expand electricity options and provide more transparent and accountable alternatives to monopoly utility service in their communities.”

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About CalCCA: Launched in 2016, the California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) represents California’s community choice electricity providers before the state Legislature and at regulatory agencies, advocating for a level playing field and opposing policies that unfairly discriminate against CCAs and their customers. There are currently 21 operational CCA programs in California serving approximately 10 million customers.

For more information about CalCCA and community choice, visit www.cal-cca.org. To stay current on CCA in California, sign up for our mailing list here.

CalCCA Statement on the CPUC’s Central Procurement Decision

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 6.11.2020
Press Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel
(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

CalCCA Statement on the CPUC’s Central Procurement Decision

Concord, Calif. – The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) today adopted a framework that designates Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) and Southern California Edison (SCE) as central buyers to procure local, multi-year resource adequacy. The California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) issued the following response:

CalCCA is disappointed that the Commission has adopted a central procurement framework for local resource adequacy that puts investor-owned utilities (IOUs), rather than an independent entity, in the powerful role of central buyer. We remain concerned, and understandably so, that the playing field will not be level under such a framework, nor will it be transparent and neutral. This is yet another example of the CPUC favoring an outdated centralized energy system where power is concentrated with the IOUs. More specifically, the CPUC decision:

  • Is a significant departure from the current framework for ensuring local reliability.
  • Limits the scope of costs that CCAs can control for their customers.
  • Will have a significant effect on the RA market, moving from a market with many buyers of local RA to one dominated by PG&E and SCE.
  • Will blunt incentives for CCAs to invest in “behind the meter” resource solutions, allocating costs to all customers on the same basis, regardless of the unique efforts of their LSEs .
  • While characterized as a “local RA” mechanism, it allows the CPE to procure any associated system and flexible RA capacity with mandatory allocation of these rights to LSEs without sufficient time to position their portfolios for annual compliance.

CalCCA continues to support the terms of the settlement agreement, which would have established a residual central buyer framework, and put a “competitively neutral, independent and creditworthy entity” in the role of central buyer.

The settlement would achieve the state’s aims by reducing the need for CAISO backstop procurement, maintaining and enhancing a liquid and robust bilateral capacity market, while also preserving the self-procurement autonomy of load-serving entities (LSEs) including community choice aggregators. The settlement has the support of CalCCA, CAISO, Calpine Corporation, Independent Energy Producers Association, Middle River Power, NRG Energy, Inc., San Diego Gas & Electric Company, Shell Energy North America,  Western Power Trading Forum, among others.

Under the settlement agreement, a central procurement entity would be tasked with purchasing residual multi-year resource adequacy capacity on behalf of LSEs on an as-needed basis to ensure RA requirements are met. Energy providers would first have the option to self-procure some or all of their customers’ share of the required resources. If they choose not to self-procure, the central procurement entity would purchase resources to address any deficiencies. More information on the settlement can be found here.

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About CalCCA: Launched in 2016, the California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) represents California’s community choice electricity providers before the state Legislature and at regulatory agencies, advocating for a level playing field and opposing policies that unfairly discriminate against CCAs and their customers. There are currently 21 operational CCA programs in California serving approximately 10 million customers.

For more information about CalCCA and community choice, visit www.cal-cca.org. To stay current on CCA in California, sign up for our mailing list here.

Celebrating 10 Years of CCA in California!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 5.1.2020
Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel
(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

2010-2020: A Decade of CCA in California

May 2020 marks the 10-year anniversary of Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) in California. CCA has come a long way since MCE launched the first operational CCA program in Marin County in 2010. There are now 21 community choice energy providers successfully serving more than 10 million customers in 170+ cities and counties throughout California! Whether motivated by climate goals, clean energy at affordable rates, economic development and green jobs, transparency and accountability, or all of the above, CCA has proven effective at helping communities achieve their energy ambitions.

Launch timeline of CCA programs in California


CCA Growth

Over the last decade 200+ cities and counties have made the choice to implement CCA in their communities. More than 170 of those communities already have CCA service, and at least 30 more are expected to have CCA service in 2020-2021 as new programs launch and existing programs expand.

Map of CCA in California


Putting Renewable Energy on the Map

CCAs have signed long-term power purchase agreements (PPAs) for more than 3,000 Megawatts (MW) of new clean generation capacity, fueling renewable energy development, green jobs, and economic growth throughout California. Community choice energy programs now serve about 25 percent of the load in the territories of the state’s three main investor-owned utilities (Pacific Gas & Electric, San Diego Gas & Electric, and Southern California Edison). By 2022, it’s projected CCAs will serve about 38 percent of the IOUs’ load. You can find out more about CCA load and procurement here: https://cal-cca.org/cca-impact/.

Locations of New-Build Clean Energy Projects with CCA PPAs


Local Programs

CCAs do much more than invest in clean energy. Because CCAs are not-for-profit public agencies, excess revenues are reinvested in communities and used to fund innovative and tailored programs that suit community preferences and interests. Recently, community choice energy programs have allocated significant funds to COVID-19 relief efforts and grid resilience initiatives. Innovative CCA programs are the focus of CalCCA’s new Community Energy Innovation webinar series. You can browse the broad range of CCA programs by clicking on the image below or visiting this page.

A Catalogue of CCA Programs and Projects can be found here:
https://cal-cca.org/cca-programs/.


California is Powered by Community Choice

Over the last decade, local governments in cities and counties throughout the state have chosen to participate in CCA to meet climate action goals, provide residents and businesses with more energy options, ensure local transparency and accountability, and drive economic development and green jobs. To find out more about how Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) works and whether your community is Powered by Community Choice go to this page.

Who powers you? Find out at https://cal-cca.org/powered/.


California Community Choice Timeline

2002AB 117 Passed
California Legislature enables Community Choice Aggregation.

2006San Joaquin Valley Power Authority Formed
Led by the Kings River Conservation District, 14 communities form the San Joaquin Valley Power Authority with the goal of starting a CCA program.

2007SJVPA’s Plan is First to be Certified
Plan to provide CCA service in Central Valley communities is certified by the California Public Utilities Commission (SJVPA suspended its efforts in 2009).

2010Marin Clean Energy (now MCE) is Launched
Becomes the first CCA to serve customers in California.

2011SB 790 Passed
Legislature details rights of CCA agencies.

2016CalCCA Formed
The California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) is created to represent the interests of CCAs at the California Legislature and regulatory agencies.

2020CCAs Serving More than 10 Million Customers
With 21 CCAs in operation and many more in progress, Community Choice Aggregation is set to reach more Californians than ever!


Thank you for joining us for this virtual celebration of CCA in California.
We appreciate your support!

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About CalCCA: Launched in 2016, the California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) represents California’s community choice electricity providers before the state Legislature and at regulatory agencies, advocating for a level playing field and opposing policies that unfairly discriminate against CCAs and their customers. There are currently 21 operational CCA programs in California serving approximately 10 million customers.

For more information about CalCCA and community choice, visit our website. To stay current on CCA in California, sign up for our mailing list here.

CalCCA Launching New “Community Energy Innovation” Webinar Series

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 4.3.2020
Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel
(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

CalCCA Launching New “Community Energy Innovation” Webinar Series
Monthly Webinars to begin April 24

The California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) is launching a new monthly webinar series on April 24 to facilitate the sharing of information and best practices within the CCA community and with the public at large.

As Community Choice Aggregators (CCAs) continue to grow and flourish in California, they are advancing innovative, industry-leading projects and programs. CalCCA’s Community Energy Innovation (CEI) webinar series provides a platform for CCAs and their partners to share experiences in a variety of focus areas, including energy resilience, customer programs, load management, and power procurement.

Calpine Energy Solutions is the webinar series sponsor. Calpine’s sponsorship funding will go directly to charities around the state that are providing relief to vulnerable communities impacted the most by the Coronavirus pandemic in California.

Here is the initial CEI webinar schedule:

Ready for Takeoff: Humboldt County’s Airport Microgrid Project
Friday, April 24, @Noon
Speakers:
Matthew Marshall/Executive Director/Redwood Coast Energy Authority
Jim Zoellick/Managing Research Engineer/Schatz Energy Research Center at Humboldt State University

Register here for the April 24 webinar.

How California Communities are Driving Investment in EV Charging Infrastructure
Friday, May 29, @10:00 a.m.
Speakers:
Jessie Denver/Program Manager Transportation Electrification and Community Resilience/East Bay Community Energy
Kielan Rathjen/Special Advisor, Zero Emission Vehicle Policy/Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development (GO-Biz)

Accelerating Decarbonization and Local Investment Through Better Data Access
Friday, June 26, @Noon
Speakers:
Aimee Gotway Bailey/Director of Decarbonization and Grid Innovation/Silicon Valley Clean Energy
Devin Hampton, CEO/UtilityAPI

Please visit the CEI Webinars webpage for additional information.

Contact for CEI Webinar Series:
Leora Broydo Vestel
Director of Communications
California Community Choice Association
leora@cal-cca.org


Thank you to our webinar sponsor!


About CalCCA: Launched in 2016, the California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) represents California’s community choice electricity providers before the state Legislature and at regulatory agencies, advocating for a level playing field and opposing policies that unfairly discriminate against CCAs and their customers. There are currently 21 operational CCA programs in California serving approximately 10 million customers.

For more information about CalCCA and community choice, visit www.cal-cca.org. To stay current on CCA in California, sign up for our mailing list here.

Evelyn Kahl Joins CalCCA as General Counsel

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 3.4.2020
Press Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel
(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

Evelyn Kahl Joins CalCCA as General Counsel
Kahl to lead association’s policy team in support of community choice energy in California

Concord, Calif. – The California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) is pleased to announce that Evelyn Kahl has joined CalCCA in the newly established role of General Counsel. Kahl brings to the role more than three decades’ experience representing energy industry clients, including Community Choice Aggregators (CCAs), large electricity and natural gas customers, and self-generation developers.

Kahl is well known for her expertise in advocating for reasonable utility rules and rates before the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) and other state energy agencies, and her ability to bring diverse stakeholders to the table to find common ground solutions to complicated energy issues. With Kahl as general counsel, CalCCA is well-positioned to lead in offering workable solutions for California’s rapidly evolving energy system, while supporting the growth and long-term sustainability of community choice in California.

“We’re thrilled to have Evie in-house to lead our growing policy team,” said CalCCA Executive Director Beth Vaughan. “Evie is uniquely qualified to represent the interests of CCAs given her wealth of experience tackling complex energy matters in our primary regulatory settings and her ability to drive collaboration and consensus results.”

CalCCA first engaged Kahl in 2017 to represent the association in the CPUC’s Power Charge Indifference Adjustment (PCIA) rulemaking. She has also represented CalCCA in the Resource Adequacy (RA) and Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) proceedings and worked to support the association’s legislative program.

Kahl successfully led CalCCA’s efforts in 2019 to reach a settlement agreement with key energy market stakeholders that proposes a new resource adequacy “central buyer” structure in California to help ensure the reliability of the state’s electric system, while preserving local procurement autonomy. The settlement parties include CalCCA, generators, energy service providers, and an investor-owned utility (IOU).

Kahl has also supported CalCCA in its co-leadership roles with IOUs in PCIA Phase 2 working groups, achieving consensus around the PCIA benchmark and IOU portfolio optimization. In the CPUC’s resource adequacy proceeding, Kahl successfully argued for a recent stay of the Commission’s decision on import RA.

Prior to joining CalCCA, Kahl was Shareholder in Buchalter’s San Francisco office and part of the firm’s Energy & Natural Resources Practice Group. Before joining Buchalter, she was a founding partner of Alcantar & Kahl LLP from 1998-2018.

Kahl is a member of the Conference of California Public Utility Counsel, the Association of Women in Water, Energy, and Environment, and is a certified mediator. She earned her J.D. magna cum laude from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law and her B.A. magna cum laude from Concordia College. Kahl is included in the 2020 Edition of The Best Lawyers in America for her work in energy law.

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About CalCCA: Launched in 2016, the California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) represents California’s community choice electricity providers before the state Legislature and at regulatory agencies, advocating for a level playing field and opposing policies that unfairly discriminate against CCAs and their customers. There are currently 19 operational CCA programs in California serving approximately 10 million customers.

For more information about CalCCA and community choice, visit www.cal-cca.org. To stay current on CCA in California, sign up for our mailing list here.

 

California CCAs Hit 3,000-Megawatt Mark for New Long-Term Clean Energy Contracts

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 11.7.2019
Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel
(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

California CCAs Hit 3,000-Megawatt Mark for New Long-Term Clean Energy Contracts

Community energy providers continue to procure resources state needs to meet ambitious decarbonization and climate change goals

Redondo Beach, Calif. – The California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) announced today that Community Choice Aggregators (CCAs) in the state have in one year added another 1,000 Megawatts (MW) in long-term power purchase agreements (PPAs) with new renewable energy projects, bringing the grand total of new-build contracts signed to 3,195 MW. The achievement reflects the strength of the CCA commitment to advancing clean energy, economic development and green jobs throughout California.

To view a map of project locations and a full list of PPAs click here: https://cal-cca.org/cca-renewable-energy-map-and-list-of-ppas/

“CCAs are continuing to rapidly secure the clean energy resources California needs to meet ambitious decarbonization and climate change goals,” said Beth Vaughan, executive director of CalCCA. “At a time of unprecedented change in California’s energy sector, aggregators are providing stability, accountability and leadership when the state needs it most.”

In addition to securing renewable energy PPAs totaling 3,195 MW, aggregators have also signed long-term battery energy storage contracts for 239.5 MW/788 Megawatt-Hours (MWh) combined, with more than half – 149.5 MW/438 MWh – contracted for in the last year alone. Of the total, 212 MW/678 MWh, or about 86%, is co-located with solar panels that will charge batteries with sun power – energy that can be discharged at times of peak demand and to provide grid stability.

Notably, 13 CCAs – six more than last year – have now signed long-term PPAs in order to meet their renewables portfolio standard (RPS) and long-term contracting requirements under SB 350, as well as local mandates set by CCA Boards. Of the 13 CCAs, five launched just last year.

CalCCA announced the 3,000-MW milestone at the association’s Fourth Annual Meeting in Redondo Beach, where more than 450 attendees are gathered to discuss the latest developments in California’s energy market, and the key role community energy providers are playing in the state’s efforts to address climate change. Last November, CalCCA announced that CCAs had achieved a 2,000-MW milestone for long-term PPAs. In fact, aggregators have added approximately 1,000 MW in each of the last three years.

California’s CCAs have to date signed a total of 76 PPAs with new solar, wind, biogas and energy storage facilities, up from 59 contracts in November 2018 – a nearly 30% increase. The contract terms range from 10 to 25 years, or 18 years on average across all contracts.

The clean energy projects are located in 19 California counties (up from 17 in 2018), from Humboldt County in the north to Riverside County in the south, with one project located in Arizona and another in New Mexico. Several projects are already operating, while others will become operational between 2019 and 2022. A map of project locations and a list of contracts can be found here.

Several local projects have been added to the list in the last year. East Bay Community Energy, for example, signed a trio of local battery energy storage contracts to facilitate the shutdown of a fossil fuel-fired power plant in downtown Oakland. The Redwood Coast Energy Authority, meanwhile, is developing a local microgrid project at the California Redwood Coast – Humboldt County Airport. RCEA will own and operate the microgrid’s solar and energy storage systems.

Aggregators are expected to make long-term investments in more than 10,000 MW of new clean energy resources including solar, wind, geothermal and energy storage by 2030, and several CCAs are currently in the process of procuring new clean energy resources. To stay on top of CCA procurement news, sign up for CalCCA’s mailing list here. PDF of this press release is here.

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About CalCCA: Launched in 2016, the California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) represents California’s community choice electricity providers before the state Legislature and at regulatory agencies, advocating for a level playing field and opposing policies that unfairly discriminate against CCAs and their customers. There are currently 19 operational CCA programs in California serving approximately 10 million customers.

For more information about CalCCA, visit www.cal-cca.org.

 

CalCCA Statement on the San Diego City Council’s Decision to Join a Regional JPA to Implement CCA

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 9.17.19
Press Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel
(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

Today, in a -7-2 vote, the San Diego City Council gave the green light for the city to participate in the San Diego Regional Community Choice Energy Authority. The joint-powers authority (JPA) will govern and operate a regional community choice aggregation (CCA) program, with the primary goal of achieving a 100 percent renewable energy portfolio. San Diego – California’s second-largest city – is an affiliate member of the California Community Choice Association (CalCCA).

“CalCCA congratulates San Diego for moving ahead with CCA after a lengthy public process. We appreciate the city’s efforts to reach consensus with other communities in the region, and its willingness to make changes to the JPA agreement based on stakeholder input, all of which led to the creation of community-responsive principles for implementing CCA in the San Diego region,” said Beth Vaughan, CalCCA’s executive director. “CalCCA stands ready to support the city and its JPA partners as they continue on a path to launching a CCA program in 2021.”

About CalCCA
Launched in 2016, the California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) represents California’s community choice electricity providers before the state Legislature and at regulatory agencies, advocating for a level playing field and opposing policies that unfairly discriminate against CCAs and their customers. There are currently 19 operational CCA programs in California serving approximately 10 million customers.

For more information about CalCCA visit www.cal-cca.org.

CalCCA and Key Energy Market Stakeholders Reach Central Buyer Settlement Agreement

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 8.30.19

Press Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel

(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

CalCCA and Key Energy Market Stakeholders Reach Central Buyer Settlement Agreement

Diverse energy market participants find common ground to help ensure reliability in California

Concord, Calif. – The California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) and several key energy market stakeholders – Calpine Corporation, Independent Energy Producers Association, Middle River Power, NRG Energy, Inc., San Diego Gas & Electric Company, Shell Energy North America, and the Western Power Trading Forum – have reached a settlement agreement that proposes a new residual resource adequacy “central buyer” structure in California to help ensure the reliability of the state’s electric system. The parties today filed a joint motion for adoption of the settlement agreement with the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC).

“CalCCA is pleased that parties representing diverse interests came together and reached consensus on a central buyer structure that supports reliability in California while preserving local procurement autonomy,” said Beth Vaughan, executive director of CalCCA. “It’s great to see that we were able to collaborate and come up with a workable solution.”

The settlement responds to the CPUC’s direction to present a “feasible” central buyer model for resource adequacy (RA) resources. Under the settlement agreement, a central procurement entity – dubbed the Resource Adequacy-Central Procurement Entity (RA-CPE) – would be tasked with purchasing residual multi-year resource adequacy capacity on behalf of load-serving entities (LSEs) on an as-needed basis to ensure RA requirements are met. Energy providers would first have the option to self-procure some or all of their customers’ share of the required resources. If they choose not to self-procure, the central procurement entity would purchase resources to address any deficiencies and then bill providers for costs incurred.

The settlement parties, including CalCCA, generators, electric service providers and an investor- owned utility, all of whom are participants in the CPUC’s resource adequacy proceeding, entered into the agreement following several weeks of thoughtful discussion and negotiation. The California Independent System Operator on August 20 hosted a settlement conference at the grid operator’s headquarters in Folsom to consider the terms of the agreement. The settlement is subject to CPUC approval.

“If adopted, the settlement agreement will advance the Commission’s stated preference for a central buyer framework, reduce the need for California Independent System Operator backstop procurement, preserve LSE self-procurement autonomy, maintain and enhance a liquid and robust bilateral capacity market, and preserve a meaningful role for the State in ensuring reliability,” the joint motion notes.

While the settlement agreement does not identify or designate a specific entity as the central buyer, it stipulates that it would be a “competitively neutral, independent and creditworthy entity” that would coordinate with the CPUC, California Energy Commission and CAISO.

The settlement agreement will be considered in the resource adequacy proceeding (R.17-09-020). A CPUC vote on whether to adopt the settlement agreement is expected by the end of 2019.

The agreement provides a workable, implementable solution for the central procurement of resource adequacy on a three-year forward basis, the settlement parties said in the joint motion, noting it is “reasonable and in the public interest and should be approved in its entirety.”

The Joint Motion/Settlement Agreement can be found here: https://cal-cca.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/Joint-Motion-for-Adoption-of-Settlement-Agreement-in-RA-Proceeding-8.30.19.pdf

Press release in PDF format here: RA.Central Buyer.Settlement.Release.Final

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About CalCCA
Launched in 2016, the California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) represents California’s community choice electricity providers before the state Legislature and at regulatory agencies, advocating for a level playing field and opposing policies that unfairly discriminate against CCAs and their customers. There are currently 19 operational CCA programs in California serving approximately 10 million customers. For more information about CalCCA, visit www.cal-cca.org.

 

 

CalCCA submits letter to Gov. Newsom on “strike force” report, offers recommendations for improving reliability of California’s energy market

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 20, 2019
Press Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel
(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

The California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) shared a letter with Gov. Newsom and legislative leaders today in response to the April report of the Governor’s Strike Force on Wildfires and Climate Change—providing a series of detailed recommendations for improving reliability of electricity service, reducing risk associated with investor-owned utility (IOU) operations, and making communities more resilient in the face of catastrophic wildfires.

“Transformations are occurring at literally every level of the state’s electric sector—and in the next few months, the Governor and Legislature will be wrestling with every single one of them,” said Beth Vaughan, executive director of CalCCA. “In our letter, we’ve shared our views on what’s happening in the market, the growing role CCAs are playing to provide safe, reliable, affordable, green energy—and the regulatory and legislative changes we believe are necessary to keep the lights on, protect ratepayers and fire victims, and ensure we have the clean energy system California will need to thrive.”

Download CalCCA’s letter here. And please share with your local partners and your representatives in the Legislature. (To find your member, click here.)

With the administration considering major reforms to the electricity sector in the wake of the PG&E bankruptcy, the CalCCA letter encourages the governor to take three key steps in this legislative session:

1. Ensure reliability in a decarbonized future: CalCCA has developed detailed recommendations for reforming existing reliability policies, such as the Resource Adequacy Program and Integrated Resource Planning Process, establishing a default central buyer for reliability, consistent with CalCCA’s proposed Central Reliability Authority, and establishing a policy to transition away from fossil resources for reliability.

2. Let utilities shed risk through a transition to public energy providers: CalCCA encourages the Governor to establish a formal pathway for-profit utilities can take to exit from electric generation services, transition their customers to public power providers, and right-size their remaining energy portfolios.

3. Address catastrophic wildfire risk in the electric sector: CalCCA offers a series of proposals for improving coordination between IOUs, CCAs, and communities impacted by wildfires, while also addressing the significant reliability issues caused by planned power shutoffs. Finally, CalCCA encourages the Governor and Legislature to enact strong organizational reforms to refocus utilities on the pressing challenge of infrastructure safety and wildfire risk mitigation.

With so many of these issues already being debated in the Legislature and regulatory agencies, we’re going to need your help to ensure every community has safe, reliable, affordable, and renewable energy choices.

Read CalCCA’s full recommendations by clicking here —and please share with your networks today!

About CalCCA
Launched in 2016, the California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) represents California’s community choice electricity providers before the state Legislature and at regulatory agencies, advocating for a level playing field and opposing policies that unfairly discriminate against CCAs and their customers. There are currently 19 operational CCA programs in California serving approximately 10 million customers.

For more information about CalCCA, visit www.cal-cca.org.

CalCCA Statement on Moody’s Assigning Investment-Grade Credit Rating to PCE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 7, 2019
Press Contact: Leora Broydo Vestel
(415) 999-4757 | leora@cal-cca.org

CalCCA Statement on Moody’s Assigning Investment-Grade Credit Rating to PCE

The California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) congratulates Peninsula Clean Energy (PCE) on obtaining a Baa2 Issuer Rating from Moody’s Investors Service.

“PCE’s achievement of an investment-grade credit rating speaks to the inherent strengths of the CCA business model in California, and the leadership role CCAs are playing in the state’s efforts to lower greenhouse gas emissions and transition to cleaner energy resources,” said Beth Vaughan, executive director of CalCCA.

The benefits of a credit rating include the potential to negotiate lower energy prices and improved credit terms for future power purchasing needs, PCE noted in a May 6 news release. “This credit rating assures regulators and legislators that PCE’s financial strength is sound and, in light of PG&E’s bankruptcy filing, the CCA business model provides a stable framework for serving customers and advancing the state’s low carbon energy future,” PCE said.

PCE provides Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) service to all cities and unincorporated areas in San Mateo County and is the second aggregator in California to be assigned a credit rating by Moody’s in the past year. MCE, which serves 34 communities across four Bay Area counties (Napa, Marin, Contra Costa, and Solano), obtained a Baa2 Issuer Rating in May 2018. Moody’s Issuer Rating is an independent assessment of the ability of entities to honor senior unsecured financial obligations and contracts.

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About CalCCA
Launched in 2016, the California Community Choice Association (CalCCA) represents California’s community choice electricity providers before the state Legislature and at regulatory agencies, advocating for a level playing field and opposing policies that unfairly discriminate against CCAs and their customers. There are currently 19 operational CCA programs in California serving approximately 10 million customers.

For more information about CalCCA visit www.cal-cca.org.